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Office of Professional Development Services

Workshops and Conferences

Through the Office of Professional Development Services (OPDS), the School of Education annually sponsors or co-sponsors a variety of workshops and conferences that serve as professional development for educators in schools and health and human services professionals in their respective fields.

Attendance at these events is generally pre-approved by schools districts or employers and is offered with two options: tuition-based graduate credit or fee-based non-graduate credit with professional development certification provided to attendees based on the number of contact hours. In the case of workshops or conferences that are co-sponsored by professional organizations, Continuing Education Units (CEU's) are available in order to contribute toward the maintenance of certification, or re-certification. These opportunities can be single day events or a multi-day workshop series/course that spans several weeks or months.

In some cases, special topic conferences on very specific topics or issues will be designed for professionals that occur on a single day.

Additionally, the OPDS works directly with school districts and health and human services employers to provide consultative services on all topics in the respective fields on a fee basis. For school districts that have a partnership with the SOE, special payment arrangements can be made that utilize credits attained by hosting student observers during clinical training.

The Office of Professional Development Services is a full-service operation that assists SOE faculty and administrators, professional organizations in the field, or individual school districts or employers, to plan and execute professional development opportunities for employees. Please use the tabs on this webpage to initiate the planning process to propose and develop a workshop or conference to support your organization's needs.

To see a list of conferences that are open for registration, and to register with a credit/debit card, please visit www.hofstra.edu/edworkshopreg.

If you have any questions regarding the conferences, workshops and professional development opportunities listed on this webpage or wish to further explore the potential of developing an event, please contact:

Betsy Salemson, Director of Professional Development Services at (516) 463-4355 or via email.

Barbara Calvo-Moran, Senior Assistant to the Director at (516) 463-5750, or via email.

Office of Professional Development Services
119 Hofstra University
230 Hagedorn Hall
Hempstead, NY 11549-1190

Events

  • TRACT Conference – October 19, 2016
  • Co-Occurring Conference – November 4, 2016
  • P.E. Consortium – November 8, 2016
  • TRACT Conference – November 14, 2016
  • Master Schedule Workshop – November 15 & 22, 2016
  • C.T.E. Conference – November 18, 2016
  • Kalikow Center Event – November 30, 2016
  • Promoting Literacy Based Culture Conference – December 2, 2016
  • Nassau County DA’s Conference – December 9, 2016
  • TRACT Conference – December 12, 2016
  • TRACT Conference – January 12, 2017
  • Student Athletes – February 2, 2017
  • TRACT Conference – February 14, 2017
  • TRACT Conference – March 3, 2017
  • Kalikow Center Symposium – March 16, 2017
  • Girlz Talk – March 18, 2017
  • Safe and Supportive Schools and Communities Conference – March 23, 2017
  • Master Schedule Workshop – March 24 & 31, 2017
  • Boyz Talk – March 25, 2017
  • French Poetry Contest – April 3, 2017
  • TRACT Conference – April 7, 2017
  • Creative Arts Therapy Conference – April 21, 2017
  • HNET Conference – April 22, 2017
  • TRACT Conference – May 11, 2017
  • AP Summer Institutes, Week 1 – June 27-30, 2017
  • English Literature & Composition; Physics 1; Spanish Language & Culture; U.S. History; Government & Politics; Biology
  • AP Summer Institutes, Week 2 – July 5-8, 2017
  • Physics 2; Chemistry; World History
  • Week 1
  • The AP Computer Science Principles course is designed to be equivalent to a first-semester introductory college computing course. In this course, students will develop computational thinking vital for success across all disciplines, such as using computational tools to analyze and study data and working with large data sets to analyze, visualize, and draw conclusions from trends. The course is unique in its focus on fostering student creativity. Students are encouraged to apply creative processes when developing computational artifacts and to think creatively while using computer software and other technology to explore questions that interest them. They will also develop effective communication and collaboration skills, working individually and collaboratively to solve problems, and discussing and writing about the importance of these problems and the impacts to their community, society, and the world.
  • AP Calculus AB is roughly equivalent to a first semester college calculus course devoted to topics in differential and integral calculus. The AP course covers topics in these areas, including concepts and skills of limits, derivatives, definite integrals, and the Fundamental Theorem of Calculus. The course teaches students to approach calculus concepts and problems when they are represented graphically, numerically, analytically, and verbally, and to make connections amongst these representations. Students learn how to use technology to help solve problems, experiment, interpret results, and support conclusions.
  • AP Calculus BC is roughly equivalent to both first and second semester college calculus courses. It extends the content learned in AB to different types of equations (polar, parametric, vector-valued) and new topics (such as Euler's method, integration by parts, partial fraction decomposition, and improper integrals), and introduces the topic of sequences and series. The AP course covers topics in differential and integral calculus, including concepts and skills of limits, derivatives, definite integrals, the Fundamental Theorem of Calculus, and series. The course teaches students to approach calculus concepts and problems when they are represented graphically, numerically, analytically, and verbally, and to make connections amongst these representations. Students learn how to use technology to help solve problems, experiment, interpret results, and support conclusions.
  • AP United States Government and Politics introduces students to key political ideas, institutions, policies, interactions, roles, and behaviors that characterize the political culture of the United States. The course examines politically significant concepts and themes, through which students learn to apply disciplinary reasoning, assess causes and consequences of political events, and interpret data to develop evidence-based arguments.
  • The AP U.S. History course focuses on the development of historical thinking skills (chronological reasoning, comparing and contextualizing, crafting historical arguments using historical evidence, and interpreting and synthesizing historical narrative) and the development of students' abilities to think conceptually about U.S. history from approximately 1491 to the present. Seven themes of equal importance – American and National Identity; Migration and Settlement; Politics and Power; Work, Exchange, and Technology; America in the World; Geography and the Environment; and Culture and Society – provide areas of historical inquiry for investigation throughout the course. These require students to reason historically about continuity and change over time and make comparisons among various historical developments in different times and places. The course also allows teachers flexibility across nine different periods of U.S. history to teach topics of their choice in depth.
  • AP Biology is an introductory college-level biology course. Students cultivate their understanding of biology through inquiry-based investigations as they explore the following topics: evolution, cellular processes — energy and communication, genetics, information transfer, ecology, and interactions.
  • AP Physics 1 is an algebra-based, introductory college-level physics course. Students cultivate their understanding of Physics through inquiry-based investigations as they explore topics such as Newtonian mechanics (including rotational motion); work, energy, and power; mechanical waves and sound; and introductory, simple circuits.
  • The AP Spanish Language and Culture course emphasizes communication (understanding and being understood by others) by applying interpersonal, interpretive, and presentational skills in real-life situations. This includes vocabulary usage, language control, communication strategies, and cultural awareness. The AP Spanish Language and Culture course strives not to overemphasize grammatical accuracy at the expense of communication. To best facilitate the study of language and culture, the course is taught almost exclusively in Spanish. The AP Spanish Language and Culture course engages students in an exploration of culture in both contemporary and historical contexts. The course develops students' awareness and appreciation of cultural products (e.g., tools, books, music , laws, conventions, institutions); practices (patterns of social interactions within a culture); and perspectives (values, attitudes, and assumptions).
  • Week 2:
  • The AP English Language and Composition course aligns to an introductory college-level rhetoric and writing curriculum, which requires students to develop evidence-based analytic and argumentative essays that proceed through several stages or drafts. Students evaluate, synthesize, and cite research to support their arguments. Throughout the course, students develop a personal style by making appropriate grammatical choices. Additionally, students read and analyze the rhetorical elements and their effects in non-fiction texts, including graphic images as forms of text, from many disciplines and historical periods.
  • AP Physics 2 is an algebra-based, introductory college-level physics course. Students cultivate their understanding of Physics through inquiry-based investigations as they explore topics such as fluid statics and dynamics; thermodynamics with kinetic theory; PV diagrams and probability; electrostatics; electrical circuits with capacitors; magnetic fields; electromagnetism; physical and geometric optics; and quantum, atomic, and nuclear physics.
  • The AP World History course focuses on developing students' understanding of the world history from approximately 8000 BCE to the present. This college-level course has students investigate the content of world history for significant events, individuals, developments, and processes in six historical periods, and develop and use the same thinking skills and methods (analyzing primary and secondary sources, making historical comparisons, chronological reasoning, and argumentation) employed by historians when they study the past. The course also provides five themes (interaction between humans and the environment; development and interaction of cultures; state building, expansion, and conflict; creation, expansion, and interaction of economic systems; development and transformation of social structures) that students explore throughout the course in order to make connections among historical developments in different times and places encompassing the five major geographical regions of the globe: Africa, the Americas, Asia, Europe, and Oceania.
  • The AP Chemistry course provides students with a college-level foundation to support future advanced course work in chemistry. Students cultivate their understanding of chemistry through inquiry-based investigations, as they explore topics such as: atomic structure, intermolecular forces and bonding, chemical reactions, kinetics, thermodynamics, and equilibrium.