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 From the Emancipation Proclamation to the Election of  Barack Obama and the Death of Trayvon Martin

From the Emancipation Proclamation to the Election of Barack Obama and the Death of Trayvon Martin

November 7-8, 2013

Student Center Theater
Sondra and David S. Mack Student Center, North Campus

In 1903, the 40th anniversary of the Emancipation Proclamation, W.E.B. DuBois wrote, “the problem of the Twentieth Century is the problem of the color-line” (The Souls of Black Folk). At the 1963 March on Washington for Jobs and Freedom commemorating the 100th anniversary of the Emancipation Proclamation, Reverend Martin Luther King, Jr. declared: “But one hundred years later, we must face the tragic face that the Negro is still not free. One hundred years later, the life of the Negro is still sadly crippled by the manacles of segregation and the chains of discrimination.”

This year marks the 150th anniversary of the Emancipation Proclamation and the 50th anniversary of the 1963 March on Washington. As Americans commemorate these anniversaries , we contemplate how far the nation has come in its quest to become a more equal society.

ALL EVENTS ARE FREE and open to the public.
Registration is encouraged -  http://www.hofstra.edu/culture

Conference Co-Directors:
Michael D’Innocenzo
Professor of History and
The Harry H. Wachtel Distinguished Teaching Professor for the Study of Nonviolent Social Change

Cheryl Mwaria
Professor of Anthropology
Chair, Department of Anthropology
Director of African Studies

Alan Singer
Director, Secondary Education Social Studies
Department of Teaching, Literacy and Leadership
Hofstra University School of Education

Symposium Schedule

Symposium Schedule

THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 7, 2013

9:35-11 a.m., Session I: What Does John F. Kennedy’s Call to Public Service
Mean for American Youth Today?
Panel discussion on presidential leadership and public service.
Howard B. Dean III, Chairman, Democratic National Committee, 2005-2009
Senior Presidential Fellow, Peter S. Kalikow Center for the Study of the
American Presidency, Hofstra University

Edward J. Rollins, Political Strategist
Senior Presidential Fellow, Peter S. Kalikow Center for the Study of the
American Presidency, Hofstra University

Scott D. Reich, Associate, Willkie Farr & Gallagher LLP
Author, The Power of Citizenship: Why John F. Kennedy Matters to a New Generation

Presented by the Peter S. Kalikow Center for the Study of the American Presidency

11:15 a.m.-12:45 p.m., Session II: Slavery on Long Island, Part I
Panelists:
Sandi Brewster-walker
, Independent Genealogist and Historian, Annapolis, MD
Claude J. Magnum, Professor Emeritus, Fordham University
Joysetta & Julius Pearse, African American Museum and Center for Education and Applied Arts
Kathleen Velsor, SUNY Old Westbury
Debra A. Willett, Hofstra University

1 -2 p.m.,   LUNCH (on your own)
Session III: Film showing: The March
The March is the feature documentary on the renowned and historic 1963 March on Washington for Jobs and Freedom. A watershed moment of the civil rights movement, the march brought together a huge coalition of powerful and revered civil rights organizations, labor unions, and civil rights leaders. It was to become the biggest civil protest in American history.

2:30 – 4 p.m., Session IV:  Film Showing: Slavery and the Law
Slavery and the Law is a captivating documentary that follows a group of Brooklyn youth as they work to create a wall mural that commemorates the shift from enslavement to the Civil Rights Movement.
The legal implications of slavery are documented in the film by looking at the Three Fifths Compromise in the United States Constitution and the Fugitive Slave Act.
Commentary:
Gloria Browne-Marshall, John Jay College of Criminal Justice, CUNY
Joan B. Gabbidon, Kings County District Attorney’s Office
Alan Singer, Hofstra University

4:30-6 p.m., Session V:  Slavery and the Law: From Emancipation Proclamation to Barack Obama to Trayvon Martin
The panel addresses the continuing racial disparity in America pertaining to the justice system, including the recent decision in the Voting Rights Act and the new forms of slavery.
Introduction:  Mark Atkinson, Class of 2015
Department of Rhetoric, Hofstra University
Panelists:
Jonathan Lightfoot, Hofstra University
Gloria Browne-Marshall, John Jay College, CUNY 
Randolph McLaughlin, Pace University
Grant Hayden, Hofstra University
Jason E. Starr, Nassau County Chapter New York Civil Liberties Union

 

6-7:30 p.m., DINNER BREAK  (on your own)
Session VI:  Film Showing – The Abolitionists
Radicals. Agitators. Troublemakers. Liberators. Called by many names, the abolitionists tore the nation apart in order to make a more perfect union. Men and women, black and white, Northerners and Southerners, poor and wealthy, these passionate antislavery activists fought body and soul in the most important civil rights crusade in American history. What began as a pacifist movement fueled by persuasion and prayer became a fiery and furious struggle that forever changed the nation.
Introduction:   Andor Skotnes, The Sage Colleges

7:30 p.m., KEYNOTE ADDRESS
(100)50 Years: At the Crossroads of Jobs, Freedom and Equality

Roslyn Brock

Roslyn Brock
Chairman, National Board of Directors
National Association for the Advancement of Colored People (NAACP)

Co-sponsored by Hofstra NAACP Chapter, Hofstra Black and Hispanic Alumni Association, New Opportunities at Hofstra (NOAH) Program

FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 8, 2013

10-11:30 a.m., Session VII
Introduction: Cheryl Mwaria, Hofstra University

History and Impact of the Emancipation Proclamation
Andor Skotnes, The Sage Colleges

Lincoln and Gettysburg
Alan Singer, Hofstra University

11:30 a.m.-12:30 p.m.    LUNCH (on your own)
Session VIII:  Film Showing – Underground Railroad: The William Still Story
The William Still Story tells the dramatic story of one of the most important yet largely unheralded individuals of the Underground Railroad. Still was determined to get as many runaways as he could to “Freedom’s Land,” smuggling them across the U.S. border to Canada. In his 14 years in the service of the Underground Railroad, he helped nearly 800 former slaves escape.
Introduction: Roosevelt Smith, Hofstra University

12:45-2:15 p.m., Session IX: Slavery on Long Island, Part II
Introduction: Cheryl Mwaria
, Hofstra University
Lynda Day, Brooklyn College, CUNY
Georgette Grier-Key,Eastville Community Historical Society
Allison Manfra McGovern, The Graduate Center, CUNY
Alan Singer, Hofstra University

DOWNLOAD PDF

Exhibitions

Through November 11th,  2013
Main Dining Room East, Mack Student Center, North Campus

Slavery and New York

In commemoration of the anniversaries of the Emancipation Proclamation and the March on Washington. Items on display were created by the freshman seminar Anthropology 14F class, and middle school students from Lawrence Road Middle School, Hempstead NY and Uniondale Middle School, Uniondale, New York. Items on display focuses on the history of slavery, abolition and struggle for Civil Rights
Teachers: Richard Tauber, April Francis and Kiesha Wilburn.
Thursday, November 7th, 11 a.m.-6p.m. and Friday, November 8th 10 a.m. - 2 p.m.
Lobby, Student Center Theater, Mack Student Center, North Campus

A Celebration of America's Black Heritage Through Documents, Artifacts, and Collectibles from 1600 to the Present

This presentation commences from the 1600s and tells, in part, their story through a collection of historical artifacts. These artifacts contain actual images, engravings and literature outlining the obstacles that took place towards the African culture brought to America, during its development. The collection also entails how Africans shaped their destiny by grasping the adjustment, which had to be made, and harnessed the power of control for themselves, to subsequently pass on the lessons and folklore onto their children, who became Americans. Items on display include -- Middle Passage Shackles, ca. 1700's; Manila Slave Bracelets 15th century; Wrought Iron Collar, African engravings, ca. 1700's

Presented by Carol Gordon, CEO, Unspoken History Treasures

Related Events:

Related Events:

Hofstra College of Liberal Arts & Sciences
in cooperation with the
Hofstra Cultural Center
and the
Center for Civic Engagement
presents
Constitution Day:
Expanding the United States Constitution:
With Agendas From the Founding Generation

Speaker: Michael D’Innocenzo, Professor of History, Hofstra University
Date/Time: Tuesday, September 17, 11 a.m.-12:30 p.m.
Location: Leo A. Guthart Cultural Center Theater,  Joan and Donald E. Axinn Library, First Floor, South Campus

Intergenerational round-table discussions to follow, 12:30-2 p.m. in 246 East Library Wing, Axinn Library, South Campus. Round-tables will address topics such as Electoral College/National Voter Project; Inequality;
Poverty and the Wealth Gap; Protest and Reform; and The Role of the Judiciary. (Pre-registration is required; space is limited.)
For more information and to register, visit hofstra.edu/culture or call (516) 463-5669. 

Hofstra Association of Black Journalists (HABJ)
presents
A Conversation with Cheryl Wills
In her book Die Free: A Heroic Family History, Ms. Wills talks about her great-great-great grandfather, Sandy Wills, who served in the Civil War as a member
of the United States Colored Troops, and her father, Clarence Wills, the first black firefighter at Engine 1/Ladder 24 – the oldest engine company in Manhattan.
Speaker: Cheryl Wills, NY 1 News Anchor
Date/Time: Monday, October 14, 6:30 p.m.
Location: Plaza Room West, Sondra and David S. Mack Student Center, North Campus

For more information on the above event, please contact Claudia Balthazar, President, HABJ at cbalthazar92@yahoo.com.

Hofstra NAACP Chapter
presents

Modern Day Slavery: Human Trafficking in the U.S.

  • 6 p.m. Documentary Showing
    Very Young Girls - a documentary film that chronicles the journey of young women through the underground

world of sexual exploitation in NYC.

  • 8 p.m., Human Trafficking: Modern Day Slavery Panel

              Professor Linda Longmire, Global Studies and Geography
              Professor Kari Jensen, Global Studies and Geography
Professor Gregory Maney, Sociology

Date/Time: Wednesday, October 16, 2013, 6 – 9:30 p.m.
Location: Plaza Room West, Sondra and David S. Mack Student Center, North Campus

Ernest green

On the Front Line With The Little Rock Nine:
A Conversation with Ernest Green
Civil Rights Activist and Graduate of Central High School

Date/Time:   Tuesday, November 5, 2-13 at 7 p.m.
Location:   Student Center Theater, Mack Student Center, North Campus

Contact: Hofstra NAACP Chapter at hofstranaacp1@gmail.com.

Black Student Union and The Pride Network presents
REAL TALK:  EMANCIPATE ALL [PDF]
A discussion as both groups look at gay rights, and how it is parallel civil rights movement, how some American school districts is the new segregation of class and demographics, and as a society what do we have to do to gain equality for all.

Date/Time:   Wednesday, November 6, 2013, at 8 p.m.
Location:       Plaza Room Middle, Mack Student Center, North Campus
Admission:    Free

Hofstra University Latin American and Caribbean Studies Program
and the
National Center for Suburban Studies at Hofstra University®
in cooperation with the 
Hofstra Cultural Center
presents a panel discussion
THE CHALLENGES OF EMANCIPATION IN THE ATLANTIC WORLD

  • Benjamin Talton, Temple University
    Defending the Political Kingdom: Capitalism, Humanitarianism and the Limits of African Sovereignty in the 20th Century
  • Enrique Martino, Humboldt University of Berlin
    Author, Enduring Atlantic Economies in the 20th Century: Nigerian Indentured Labour on the Plantation Island of Fernando Po
  • Christopher Schmidt-Nowara, Tufts University
    Defending Slavery in an Age of Emancipation: Spain, Cuba, and Puerto Rico in the Early Nineteenth Century

Date/Time: Wednesday, November 13, 11:15 a.m.-12:40 p.m. (Common Hour)
Location: Leo A. Guthart Cultural Center Theater, Joan and Donald E. Axinn Library, First Floor, South Campus

For more information please contact Benita Sampedro via email.

Hofstra Cultural Center
in collaboration with the
Black Student Union
Collegiate Women of Color
NAACP Hofstra Chapter
NOAH Program
present a lecture and book signing

Ebony and Ivy: Race, Slavery, and the Troubled History of America's Universities
Craig Steven Wilder
Professor and Head of History
Massachusetts Institute of Technology
Professor Wilder documents the uncomfortable truth of the inextricable tie between slavery and the ivory tower, how venerable colleges, including Harvard, Princeton,
William and Mary, Yale, and others, vied for the attention, land, sons, and money of plantation owners. Slavery provided financial support to the colleges and secure
career prospects for many of their graduates, and many colleges owned slaves used for work, trade, and sale. What began for many universities as an ostensible mission
of civilizing savages—Native Americans and Africans—later morphed into support for the establishment and development of colonies and territorial expansion. In the
growing debate about slavery, abolition, and the movement to return Africans to Africa, prestigious universities and scholars helped to frame and address questions
of theology, economics, medicine, history, and other areas of study in the growing debate around the issue, many legitimizing slavery and racism even as they
benefited from it.

Date/Time:    Monday, November 18, 2013, at 7:30 p.m.
Location:        Leo A. Guthart Cultural Center Theater, Axinn Library
     First Floor, South Campus
Admission:     Free


For more information please contact the
Hofstra Cultural Center at
(516) 463-5669.

Symposium Sponsors:

  • African Studies Program
  • Black and Hispanic Alumni Association
  • Black Student Union
  • Center for Civic Engagement
  • Collegiate Women of Color
  • Department of Anthropology
  • Department of Global Studies and Geography
  • Department of History
  • Department of Teaching, Literacy and Leadership
  • Hofstra Association of Black Journalists
  • Latin American and Caribbean Studies Program
  • NAACP Hofstra Chapter
  • National Center for Suburban Studies at Hofstra University®
  • New Opportunities at Hofstra (NOAH) Program
  • Office of Multicultural & International Student Programs
  • Peter S. Kalikow Center for the Study of the American Presidency