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Ancient Echoes in Contemporary Printmaking

January 27 - March 20, 2009
Emily Lowe Gallery


Jessica Baker, Tulip Leaf Print
Jessica Baker, Tulip Leaf Print, 2007/8
Ancient Echoes in Contemporary Printmaking features the prints of five New York City based artists: Jessica Baker, Michael Herstand, Brian Lynch, Tomomi Ono and Mary Pinto. These artists create compelling and innovative prints by utilizing a combination of traditional and contemporary printmaking techniques. The breadth and diversity of the prints in this exhibition, from traditional lithographs to digitally manipulated photograms, will exemplify the myriad possibilities of individual exploration and expression inherent in printmaking.

Jessica Baker pulls copper and solar plate etchings, monotypes and monoprints on a Takach table-top etching press in her studio located in Clinton Hill, Brooklyn. Her most recent series of unique, circular prints explore the powerful archetype of the circle.

Michael Herstand carves abstracted Icelandic landscapes, developed from plein-air drawings, into woodblocks and then prints them on his table-top etching press in his studio in Gowanus, Brooklyn.

Brian Lynch executes quick sketches of New York City people and places on his palm pilot, which then become the basis for his planographic prints. The “plates” are actually ink jet prints used like lithograpy stones and are run through Brian’s American French Tool etching press in his storefront studio in Manhattan.

Tomomi Ono, a master lithographer, is interested in capturing the moment by using subjects picked from everyday life like seeds and fruit. She creates her prints on a Fuchs & Lang antique geared lithography press in her studio in Gowanus, Brooklyn.

Mary Pinto produces photographic prints both in her studio in Greenpoint, Brooklyn and at multi-media facilities around the city. She uses a cameraless photogram process, either alone or in combination with digital manipulation, to develop images concerned with the natural world and the imperfection and impermanence inherent in nature.

Michael Herstand, View from Oscar

Michael Herstand, View from Osar, 2007

Brian Lynch

Brian Lynch, Surfer, 2007


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  • Women in Contrast