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Bradley Phillippi

Assistant Professor of Anthropology


Degrees

PHD, 2016, Northwestern Univ; MA, 2010, SUNY Univ Cntr Albany; BS, 2007, Illinois State Univ


Bio

I am an assistant professor of anthropology and director for the Center for Public Archaeology at Hofstra University. As an historical archaeologist, I have excavated post-medieval sites in Ireland, as well post-Columbian sites in the Caribbean and North American Midwest and Northeast. I also have substantive field experience on Long Island, where I use material remains to illuminate the lesser-known or forgotten lives of people in recent history.

With strong interest in political economy, social inequality, labor, and race in everyday life, my  current research examines changing labor relations and what they bring to bear on processes of racialization in eighteenth- and nineteenth-century New York. My work in Setauket, on Long Island, documents the transition from enslaved to wage labor on an early nineteenth-century farmstead, a process I found materialized through changes in daily practice and the reorganization of domestic space. My research lent insights into the system of slavery that pervaded Long Island’s colonial and early-American landscape, and the everyday lives of nonwhite workers, an important aspect of Northern history that has become obscured by popular narratives about the past. My research has also been used to educate school groups about African American history and in the production of local exhibits.

As the director of the Center for Public Archaeology, I am firmly committed to community engagement and collaboration. Personally I find that archaeology is an unconventional but effective way to empower marginalized communities. Often times this requires working closely with community members, local organizations, and other stakeholders, and identifying common interests and concerns. History is a powerful resource, and through archaeology assist communities with asserting alternative histories and use the material record to address contemporary issues of race and racism, discrimination, poverty, and inequality.


Teaching Interests

Anthropological archaeology; historical archaeology; community-based research; archaeological method and theory; laboratory analysis; African American and labor history; and race and ethnicity.


Research Interests

Practice theory, spatiality, and materialism; labor relations; social inequality, discrimination, and poverty; race and racism; public memory and the production of history; and archaeological practice. My regional interest is the eighteenth- and nineteenth-century Northeast North America.


Recent Courses Taught

Course Title Level
ANTH 001 (BH)HUMAN EVOL IN ANTH PRSPCTV Undergraduate
ANTH 005 (BH)ARCHLGY:RCVRNG MTRL PAST Undergraduate
ANTH 014F (BH) ANTHR OF EXHIBIT & MUSEUM Undergraduate
ANTH 100 DEPT HONORS CANDIDACY: ESSAY Undergraduate
ANTH 137 (BH) RACEÐ ANTH PERSPV Undergraduate
ANTH 151 INDEPENDENT STDY: RDGS IN ANTH Undergraduate
ANTH 191 RSRCH SEM IN ANTHROPOLOGY Undergraduate
ANTH 192 ANTHROPOLOGY INTERNSHIP Undergraduate
HIST 143 AMER COLONIAL HIST Undergraduate
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