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Summer 2018 Special Topic Descriptions

(Fall 2018 Special Topic Descriptions)

Summer Session I

Criminology – CRM

CRM 187C (DL), CRN 60099: (IS) Juvenile Delinquency and Justice
This course is designed to understand the origins of the juvenile justice system and the historical shifts in policies and treatment of juvenile delinquents.

Summer Session II

Criminology – CRM

CRM 187K (DL), CRN 70080: (IS) Surveillance
This course is intended to examine in depth the nature, causes of origin, and means of control of surveillance as it has become a central means of social ordering and national and international governance.

Geology – GEOL

GEOL280E (01), CRN 70313: Regional Geology for Teachers and Travelers: Long Island Natural History Through Field Trips
This course will introduce elementary and secondary STEM education students to the natural history of Long Island through field trips to four areas that illustrate different environments and geological processes relevant to understanding the origin, history, and future of the island. The field trips are intended to model trips and activities that can be done with elementary and secondary students. Participants will use the trip experiences to develop outdoor teaching activities that engage their students in learning about the natural history of Long Island.
Course will meet 9:00 am – 3:00 pm on four consecutive Saturdays in July.

Radio, Television, Film - RTVF

RTVF 180J (SA), CRN 70275: Irish Films: Myths, Legends, and Realities
In this course we will examine strategies of screen storytelling, focusing on the representations of Ireland in film from the Silent era through Hollywood film to the contemporary independent cinema of today.
We will explore the ways movies have been used to present Irish history and culture: what has been made fanciful, what myths have been indulged, and what realities have been revealed in a clearer light. We will watch contemporary films in the The Galway Film Fleadh – Ireland’s leading film festival – which runs concurrently with the class, watch more classical films such as Man of Aran, The Quiet Man, and Ryan’s Daughter, and such modern era films as The Wind That Shakes the Barley, The Magdalene Sisters, The Field, Waking Ned Devine, and others.

Summer Session III

Criminology – CRM

CRM 187Q (DL), CRN 80019: (IS) Ethics in Policing
This course develops the ethical decision-making skills that are essential in the field of criminal justice across all three elements of the criminal justice system: the police, the courts, and corrections.


Fall 2018 Special Topic Descriptions

Anthropology – ANTH

ANTH 188K (A), CRN 95610: Dangerous Ideas

This course has multiple sections in multiple departments (see list below).  If any one of the sections listed below is closed, just register for another one.  They are all the same course and will meet together. 
Ideas matter. Concepts such as cultural identity, democracy, and religious liberty have inspired social movements, shaped ways of life and political systems, and dramatically influenced the lives of individuals. Concepts, such as race, capitalism, and consumerism play an important role in contemporary debates in the United States. But powerful ideas can be dangerous, creating turmoil by favoring one group over another, by destabilizing the status quo, or indeed by supporting the status quo when change is very much needed; sometimes they are also dangerous because of unanticipated implications or unintended consequences. 
This one-credit explores some of these powerful ideas and the way(s) in which they may be dangerous. Each week a faculty member from a different department in the liberal arts will explore a concept that has shaped human experience across time and space. Attendance is obligatory and a brief reflection paper at the end of the course will be required. Some weeks may also have short recommended reading assignments. However, no advance preparation for any lecture or class meeting will be necessary; there is no required reading! 
The course is available only on a pass/D+/D/fail basis.
Cross listed with CLL 194 (A), CRN 95615; DRAM 110C (A), CRN 95611; HIST 006M (A), CRN 95612; PHI 051D (A), CRN 95545; RELI 141F (A), CRN 95613; SOC 189C (A), CRN 95614.

Comparative Literature & Language - CLL

CLL 194 (A), CRN 95615: Dangerous Ideas
This course has multiple sections in multiple departments (see list below).  If any one of the sections listed below is closed, just register for another one.  They are all the same course and will meet together. 
Ideas matter. Concepts such as cultural identity, democracy, and religious liberty have inspired social movements, shaped ways of life and political systems, and dramatically influenced the lives of individuals. Concepts, such as race, capitalism, and consumerism play an important role in contemporary debates in the United States. But powerful ideas can be dangerous, creating turmoil by favoring one group over another, by destabilizing the status quo, or indeed by supporting the status quo when change is very much needed; sometimes they are also dangerous because of unanticipated implications or unintended consequences. 
This one-credit explores some of these powerful ideas and the way(s) in which they may be dangerous. Each week a faculty member from a different department in the liberal arts will explore a concept that has shaped human experience across time and space. Attendance is obligatory and a brief reflection paper at the end of the course will be required. Some weeks may also have short recommended reading assignments. However, no advance preparation for any lecture or class meeting will be necessary; there is no required reading! 
The course is available only on a pass/D+/D/fail basis.
Cross listed with ANTH 188K (A), CRN 95610; DRAM 110C (A), CRN 95611; HIST 006M (A), CRN 95612; PHI 051D (A), CRN 95545; RELI 141F (A), CRN 95613; SOC 189C (A), CRN 95614.

Criminology – CRM

CRM 187P (01), CRN 95403: (IS) Forensic Psychology
Forensic psychology is broadly defined as any application of psychological research, methods, theory, and practice to a task faced by the legal system. The essential focus will be looking at the impact of psychological research and applied psychology on the legal system. The topics for study will include: the role of the forensic psychologist, psychology of law enforcement, consulting and testifying in the criminal and civil cases, the psychology of violence, intimidation and sexual assault including - battered women's syndrome, child sexual abuse. It may also include the consideration and determination of insanity and competence, the assessment of dangerousness, child custody, death penalty trials and appeals, and how forensic psychologist' influence public policy.

CRM 187R (A), CRN 94412: (IS) Race and Criminality
This course will investigate the social and legal constructions of criminality of racialized subjects and develop and understanding of how the creation and management of racial hierarchies have been assisted by legislation and law enforcement in US history.

Computer Science – CSC

CSC 144F (01), CRN 96059: VR/AR Creation Lab
This intensive lab is offered to students who are interested in developing an AR or VR project in a collaborative setting. The ideal student has either taken a game development or VR Storytelling course or is concurrently taking one in Fall 2018. The course will be run like an incubator whereby students will pitch ideas on day one, and begin working on their projects thereafter.  This course meets in the second half of the Fall 2018 term.
Cross listed with JRNL 180Z (01), CRN 95953; RTVF 180Z (01), CRN 95555.

Drama – DRAM

DRAM 110C (A), CRN 95611: Dangerous Ideas
This course has multiple sections in multiple departments (see list below).  If any one of the sections listed below is closed, just register for another one.  They are all the same course and will meet together. 
Ideas matter. Concepts such as cultural identity, democracy, and religious liberty have inspired social movements, shaped ways of life and political systems, and dramatically influenced the lives of individuals. Concepts, such as race, capitalism, and consumerism play an important role in contemporary debates in the United States. But powerful ideas can be dangerous, creating turmoil by favoring one group over another, by destabilizing the status quo, or indeed by supporting the status quo when change is very much needed; sometimes they are also dangerous because of unanticipated implications or unintended consequences. 

This one-credit explores some of these powerful ideas and the way(s) in which they may be dangerous. Each week a faculty member from a different department in the liberal arts will explore a concept that has shaped human experience across time and space. Attendance is obligatory and a brief reflection paper at the end of the course will be required. Some weeks may also have short recommended reading assignments. However, no advance preparation for any lecture or class meeting will be necessary; there is no required reading!
The course is available only on a pass/D+/D/fail basis.
Cross listed with ANTH 188K (A), CRN 95610; CLL 194 (A), CRN 95615; HIST 006M (A), CRN 95612; PHI 051D (A), CRN 95545; RELI 141F (A), CRN 95613; SOC 189C (A), CRN 95614.

Engineering – ENGG

ENGG 197J 181A (01), CRN 95266: Human-Computer Interactions
The objective of this course is to introduce students to the basic concepts and theories that help us understand how learning human strengths and limitations can lead to better design, more effective learning, friendlier human computer interactions and safer environments.
This course considers the following topics, an introduction to human factors, research methods, design and evaluation methods, human sensory systems, cognition, decision making, stress and workload, safety and human error, principles of human computer interaction, sketch design and prototyping, handless interaction.

French – FREN 

FREN 180G (01), CRN 95558: France Through Songs
Introduces students to major 20th century French singers. The course uses biopics of singers to apprehend the historical background in which the artists became famous. A strong emphasis is put on the poetics of songs. 

Health Professions – HPR

HPR 179J (01), CRN 96218: Data Informatics
Data is needed to access health.   In the digital age, there is a plethora of data collected in the delivery of healthcare.  This course will cover data in health and the devices used to record this data by consumers and clinicians.  Over $40 billion has been invested in the health care for digital systems; clinicians rely on data to provide care to the patient.  Data allows you to analyze and improve the delivery of care and identify opportunities to innovate.  The internet of Things, devices like Fitbits, etc., will transform the assessment of health and delivery of healthcare.   This course will cover data in health; data in healthcare; data across systems; and data in action.

History – HIST

HIST 006M (A), CRN 95612: Dangerous Ideas
This course has multiple sections in multiple departments (see list below).  If any one of the sections listed below is closed, just register for another one.  They are all the same course and will meet together. 
Ideas matter. Concepts such as cultural identity, democracy, and religious liberty have inspired social movements, shaped ways of life and political systems, and dramatically influenced the lives of individuals. Concepts, such as race, capitalism, and consumerism play an important role in contemporary debates in the United States. But powerful ideas can be dangerous, creating turmoil by favoring one group over another, by destabilizing the status quo, or indeed by supporting the status quo when change is very much needed; sometimes they are also dangerous because of unanticipated implications or unintended consequences.
This one-credit explores some of these powerful ideas and the way(s) in which they may be dangerous. Each week a faculty member from a different department in the liberal arts will explore a concept that has shaped human experience across time and space. Attendance is obligatory and a brief reflection paper at the end of the course will be required. Some weeks may also have short recommended reading assignments. However, no advance preparation for any lecture or class meeting will be necessary; there is no required reading!
The course is available only on a pass/D+/D/fail basis.
Cross listed with ANTH 188K (A), CRN 95610; CLL 194 (A), CRN 95615; DRAM 110C (A), CRN 95611; PHI 051D (A), CRN 95545; RELI 141F (A), CRN 95613; SOC 189C (A), CRN 95614.

Honor College Seminars – HUHC

HUHC 20B (H1), CRN 91107: Cabinet of Curiosities
This seminar takes its inspiration from 17th century cabinets of curiosities or wunderkammern (wonder rooms).  These were collections of the exotic and the bizarre, including both natural specimens and cultural artefacts brought back from distant lands. Whilst these cabinets served to prove the collector’s social status, they were also invitations to think. Objects were grouped in fluid taxonomies rather than rigid hierarchies, and viewers were invited to marvel at the wonders of the world.
In this seminar, we will seek to create our own cabinet of curiosities—each object to be selected by an individual student but researched collaboratively by us all. Hence there will be no predetermined curriculum for the seminar; rather, the areas of research will be determined by student’s  own intellectual and cross-disciplinary interests.
(The chair of the Religion department has indicated this course may be counted as a Religion elective toward the completion of the requirements for majors or minors.)

HUHC 20C (H1), CRN 92049: Justice for All: An American Reality or Illusion?
Through an exploration of past and recent court decisions, historical and sociological materials, we aim in this class to discern whether race, ethnicity, national origin, gender and poverty provide barriers to obtaining justice in the United States. Students will also observe a court or administrative proceeding and be challenged at the end of the semester to provide suggestions for changes they identify as necessary in the American justice system.  
(The chair of the Sociology department has indicated this course may be counted as a departmental elective toward the completion of the requirements for the Criminology major or minor.)

HUHC 20D (H1), CRN 92052: Water, Water, Everywhere
“Water, Water Everywhere” is an interdisciplinary exploration of the most curious and pervasive substance in the universe – water.  We will explore several “big ideas” about water:  the ubiquity, pervasiveness and anomaly of water in the universe and on our planet; and humanity's relationship to and agency over water -- its power, its limits, its necessity for our survival as a species.  We’ll delve, at a basic level, into the science of how water is put together —  the role of water in the human body, our planet, and the universe; the economics, politics, and sociology of water; and water’s power as a metaphor, religious symbol, and theme in literature.  Individual students will write a mid-term paper that explores some aspect of water that matches their interest.  Students will then work in teams that bring together diverse majors and interests to produce a final research-based multimedia project that tells a compelling story about water.

HUHC 20E (H1), CRN 92053: Bitter/Sweet:  British Literature, Consumer Culture, Global Contexts
This course traces the emergence of modern concepts of consumption through selected works of British literature that span the eighteenth, nineteenth, and twentieth centuries.  We will look at literary texts--such as Jane Austen's Mansfield Park, Emily Bronte's Wuthering Heights, Lewis Carroll's Alice's Adventures in Wonderland, George Orwell's 1984, Jean Rhys' "The Day They Burned the Books," and Christina Rossetti's "Goblin Market"--through an interdisciplinary lens, and in relation to contemporary works of cultural criticism, such as Stanley Mintz's Sweetness and Power: The Place of Sugar in Modern History, Bee Wilson's Consider the Fork, and Wolfgang Schivelbusch's Tastes of Paradise:  A Social History of Spices, Stimulants, and Intoxicants.  Beginning in the late 1600s, new products, including coffee from Arabia, tea from China, and sugar from the Caribbean, began to flow into English ports.  In the wake of the institutionalization of the trans-Atlantic slave trade, and the expansion of the British Empire's overseas territories, English writers began to consider how global trade was at once creating a seemingly insatiable consumer demand for imported commodities, and giving rise to new arenas of social interaction, such as coffeehouses, tea shops, and urban pleasure gardens.  At the same time, many of the commodities upon which the English were now dependent were being produced by men, women, and children who were either enslaved or exploited for their labor.  As the literary texts in this course juxtapose the worlds of the imperial capital and the colony, they foreground questions relating to broader issues of the free market, economic injustice, racial division, and gender.  
(The chair of the English department has indicated this course may be counted as an English/Creative Writing elective toward the completion of the requirements for majors or minors.)

HUHC 20F (H1), CRN 92051: Sufism:  Islamic Mysticism or a Form of Social Network?
Sufism is best known as the Islamic Mysticism. This, however, is only a part of the story. In fact, Sufism emerged as a social phenomenon parallel to the mainstream Islam by the 11th century CE and by the 14th century started assuming the role of the state ideology in all major non-Arab regions of Islamic world. As social networks, Sufi brotherhoods (orders) have been responsible for Islamic missionary activity from Asia (China and India) to Africa and to Europe’s Balkan Peninsula. In the last several centuries Sufism served as the middle class Ideology and the source of inspiration for Persian, Turkic and Indian literature. Poetry brought Sufi philosophical and spiritual ideas beyond Muslim world deeply affecting European and American culture. For centuries Sufism provided social and political stability. Unfortunately, beginning with the 20th century Salafi ideologies started seeing local Sufi Islam as its principle foe and now are waging a major war on Sufism. Yet, in many places Sufi tolerance still serves as alternative to Islamic fundamentalism.  This course will examine both the history of Sufism and its place in contemporary religious and political discourses.

HUHC 20G (H1), CRN 93059: Mass Communication and Social Movements in Latin America
This course examines how social movements in Latin America have deployed mass communication as a tool of their grassroots mobilizing efforts across the continent. Using historical and contemporary case studies in the region, students will be introduced to the variety of strategies that have been applied by Indigenous, peasant, Afro-descendant, student and women’s organizations to contest the political, social and economic status quo in their respective countries. From Bolivian Miner’s Radio in the 1940s to the Zapatista National Liberation Front in Mexico in the 1990s, from community-published newspapers, to contemporary social media campaigns, we will critically assess the successes and the challenges of constructing a bottom-up counter-narrative to the mainstream, establishment media system in Latin America.
The class will have a combination lecture and seminar format, with students expected to participate actively in discussions of readings, extensive video/film presentations, guest lectures, as well as unfolding issues making news in the region.
(The chair of the RTVF department has indicated this course may be counted as an RTVF elective toward the completion of the requirements for majors or minors.)

HUHC 20I (H1), CRN 95834: Reading and Writing about Climate Change and Other 'Hot' Topics in Environmental Science
In an era featuring increasing concern for the environment, but at the same time, an increase in partisanship, how do we consume, interpret, and communicate information about topics such as climate change and sustainability? Throughout this seminar, we will learn how to analyze scientific writing in the mainstream media, academic journals, and governmental reports. Students will have the opportunity to select articles of interest, prepare critiques, and lead group paper discussions. In addition to reading and critiquing the work of others, students will learn how to write about science for both technical and broader audiences. Enhancing these reading and writing assignments will be background lectures demonstrating, at an introductory level, how the various Earth systems operate, how we as humans influence them, and how we can limit our impacts in a just and efficient manner.  Field trips off campus to the Hempstead Plains and an Escape Room experience will complement in-class activities and create opportunities for students to get to know one another.
(The Director of Sustainability Studies has indicated this course may be counted as a Sustainability elective toward the completion of the requirements for majors or minors.)   

HUHC 20J (H1), CRN 94569: This is Your Brain on Politics: Manifestations and Applications in Political Psychology
The standard model for explaining political behavior is Enlightenment rationalism, updated by the rational-choice model prevalent in the social sciences.  However, both contemporary political events and new brain-scanning technology increasingly remind us of how incomplete that approach is.  Enter the discipline of political psychology.   In this course, which surveys the prominent applications and manifestations of this new approach to explaining political behavior, we’ll examine the political psychology of identity, ideology, racism/intolerance, voting behavior, leadership, international conflict and cooperation, terrorism, decision-making, social movements and more.
(The chair of the Political Science department has indicated this course may be counted as a Political Science elective toward the completion of the requirements for majors or minors.)

Italian Studies – ITST

ITST 140Z (A), CRN 95546: (IS) Made in Italy
What is the association that we make with things made in Italy? What makes Italian products iconic? This course (taught in English) aims to examine Italian culture and society by using a theme-based approach: the most popular Italian products (and ideas) that are exported around the world. All class meetings will include discussions about where we see Italian products, art, and design in our everyday life here in the United States (and around the world) and we will decide how the two cultures (USA and Italy) perceive each other based on the products that they consume. Additionally, we will go beyond the concept of "Made in Italy" as merely pertaining to manufactured products; we will also apply the expression to ideas about politics, art, and science that have seeped into our culture by way of Italian thinkers.
Class is taught in English.

Jewish Studies – JWST

JWST 101G (A), CRN 95821: (HP) Master of Suspicion
This course will explore the rebellions of revolutionary Jewish intellectuals against the pressures of modernity. We will explore how the fields of psychology, sociology, critique of political economy, semiology or political theory were platforms to show the shortcoming of a society that was simultaneously forcing their integration and resisting their inclusion.
Cross listed with RELI 140W (A), CRN 95820.

JWST 101S (A), CRN 96222: (HP) Social Justice, Activism, and Jews
This course explores the different paths Jews have taken to transform their societies, revolutionize their contexts, and struggle for a just world. We will study ideas and practices from individuals and communities who have fought for economic, racial, sexual, political and environmental justice in the past and today. This course is an excellent fit for students interested in religion, sociology, history, Latin American and Caribbean Studies, Middle Eastern Studies, political science, LGBTQ+ studies, Afro-American studies, Law and Jewish studies among disciplines. 
Cross listed with RELI 141S (A), CRN 96223.

Journalism – JRNL

JRNL 180Z (01), CRN 95953: VR/AR Creation Lab
This intensive lab is offered to students who are interested in developing an AR or VR project in a collaborative setting. The ideal student has either taken a game development or VR Storytelling course or is concurrently taking one in Fall 2018. The course will be run like an incubator whereby students will pitch ideas on day one, and begin working on their projects thereafter.  This course meets in the second half of the Fall 2018 term.
Cross listed with CSC 144F (01), CRN 96059; RTVF 180Z (01), CRN 95555.

Linguistics – LING

LING 181A (A), CRN 95535: Translation Studies
Translation is one of the most important cross-linguistic and cross-cultural practices. This course is an introduction to the discipline of translation studies and focuses on what you need to know about it: the different perspectives of translation and the key issues such as equivalence in translation, translation evaluation, and the role of translation in language teaching globalization, and intercultural communication. Knowledge of a foreign language is not required.

Mass Media Studies - MASS

MASS 181N (A), CRN 94171: Sports, Media, and Contemporary Culture
This course will examine why sports and sports personalities are important in understanding society. This course will provide an examination of athletes and sports heroes. Media coverage and media use by sports figures and organizations will be explored. A critical analysis of the relationship between media industries and organized sports will be provided. What role do media play in creating and maintain emotional attachment to players or teams? What role do sports personalities play in shaping society and politics? The team/player/fan relationship will be explored as a media phenomenon. Historical and modern sports characters, events and controversies will be considered. Topics to be covered include: the significance of the changing media landscape in sports coverage, issues of “fairness” including race and gender, the impact of unionization and commercialism in sports, the influence of sports on conversations about public health information, and scandals.
The aim of the course is to enable students to engage critically with two phenomena that are central to an understanding of modern society: media technologies and institutions, and organized sports. The course is designed to increase the student’s understanding of the social significance of diverse sports and sports figures. Sports will be examined as a communication phenomenon associated with developments in media industries and technologies. Sports culture will be used as an indicator of cultural values and as producer and reflection of cultural meaning.

Philosophy – PHI

PHI 005L (01), CRN 95823: Insights into Love
What though does it mean to love? What does it mean to be loved? How might love be relevant to doing philosophy ("love of wisdom")?! This course seeks to understand these questions as well as provide some insights into the nature of love. No prior experience in philosophy required. No credit for this course if you have already taken PHI 80.

PHI 051C (QR), CRN 95541: Coding Philosophical Problems
This course offers a practical, hands-on introduction to computer programming, through a particular focus on philosophically interesting applications. Students will learn the basics of a modern general-purpose programming language that is used in a wide variety of academic, scientific and business settings. Students will write programs that display something like human intelligence or reasoning ability, and programs to model and explore hypotheses about the evolutionary origin of morality and altruism. No prior exposure to programming or to philosophy is required.

PHI 051D (A), CRN 95545: Dangerous Ideas
This course has multiple sections in multiple departments (see list below).  If any one of the sections listed below is closed, just register for another one.  They are all the same course and will meet together. 
Ideas matter. Concepts such as cultural identity, democracy, and religious liberty have inspired social movements, shaped ways of life and political systems, and dramatically influenced the lives of individuals. Concepts, such as race, capitalism, and consumerism play an important role in contemporary debates in the United States. But powerful ideas can be dangerous, creating turmoil by favoring one group over another, by destabilizing the status quo, or indeed by supporting the status quo when change is very much needed; sometimes they are also dangerous because of unanticipated implications or unintended consequences. 
This one-credit explores some of these powerful ideas and the way(s) in which they may be dangerous. Each week a faculty member from a different department in the liberal arts will explore a concept that has shaped human experience across time and space. Attendance is obligatory and a brief reflection paper at the end of the course will be required. Some weeks may also have short recommended reading assignments. However, no advance preparation for any lecture or class meeting will be necessary; there is no required reading! 
The course is available only on a pass/D+/D/fail basis.
Cross listed with ANTH 188K (A), CRN 95610; CLL 194 (A), CRN 95615; DRAM 110C (A), CRN 95611; HIST 006M (A), CRN 95612; RELI 141F (A), CRN 95613; SOC 189C (A), CRN 95614.

PHI 052 (01), CRN 95356: (HP) Philosophy & Pop Culture
Once dismissed as "kid's stuff," the comic book – or graphic novel – has gained respectability as a genuine literary form in recent decades. Indeed, the comic book, or graphic novel, is a good vehicle for a certain kind of speculative fiction, where philosophical ideas can be portrayed and examined. Stories of superheroes and villains, androids and aliens, travels through time and space are not merely thrilling to read, but offer food for thought and contemplation. In this class we will consider a selection of comic books classics, such as Watchmen, Ronin, The Fantastic 4, Longshot, as well as newer ones, such as O Human Star and Seconds., and explore their philosophical content. Students should have some familiarity already with the genre and the works mentioned. The course will also have as a theme, how the superhero genre makes certain assumptions about good and evil, and about who we are supposed to be rooting for, that raise philosophical questions about who "the good guys" are. We will touch on many of the traditional problems that philosophers have wrestled
with – free will, personal identity, the nature of time, the existence of God – in a unique and entertaining way.

PHI 181W (01), CRN 95722: Philosophical Perspectives on Happiness and Ways of Life
What does philosophy have to say about how can one live authentically, with less anxiety and more joy, while embracing your own and the world's imperfections?!
Philosophy is often abstract and theoretical, but a surprising amount of it is about "ways of life" -- how to live, how to achieve happiness, how to overcome fear and anxiety and to avoid unnecessary stress, how to develop self-acceptance, or about how to experience joy, mindfulness, purposefulness, and self-awareness. This course will consider some "ways of life" – from among such examples as stoicism among the Greeks and Romans to its revival in modern stoicism, Kant, Nietzsche, Foucault's theory of philosophy as "care of the self," and others -- and whether some "ways of life" are more conducive to realizing happiness than others. The course will also consider how to put into practice in contemporary life some of the recommendations made for how to live well, including voluntary participation in modern Stoic week, or "training for mindfulness and resilience."

Public Relations – PR

PR 180N (01), CRN 95551: Creative Leadership Strategies
What critical thinking skills have entrepreneur leaders like Steve Jobs, Richard Branson and Oprah Winfrey used to help establish the success of their global brands? Through a process of lectures, case studies, in-class exercises, and individual discovery students will explore ways to both critically listen and think about diverse and niche-based audiences. This course is designed to provide students with insight into lessons of leadership as applied to integrated communication strategies. Course lessons emphasize creative, leadership qualities and critical thinking techniques through conceptual and theoretical perspectives. Students will conceptualize best leadership practices to engage and interact with desired publics through assessing needs and opportunities required to spearhead authentic communications strategies. Students will better understand and explore how individual surroundings and experiences play a larger role in leadership roles.

PR 180O (DL), CRN 96217: The Social Impact of Social Media
In recent years, social media platforms has been charged with “hacking” elections by spreading fake news; contributing to untruthful claims by politicians who circumvent fact-checkers in the traditional media in order to communicate with citizens directly; enabling trolls to viciously bully people; contributing to the decline of family conversations; allowing private data to be shared with advertisers, political consultants and hackers; making Americans more polarized because people only see information aligned with their pre-existing beliefs; and contributing to increased rates of depression in individuals who think other peoples’ lives look more glamorous online. At the same time, social media has given people powerful platforms for speaking out against injustice and organizing social movements. This class will study the social impact of social media and consider possible solutions to the challenges posed by its increased use.

Radio, Television, Film - RTVF

RTVF 154C (01), CRN 95554: TV Shows: Writing Murphy's Law
This course will take a deep look into the career of writer, director, producer, and show-runner, Ryan Murphy. As the creator of "Nip/Tuck," "Glee," "American Horror Story," "Scream Queens," "The New Normal," "Feud," "American Crime Story," and others, Murphy has been one of the most influential powerhouses and influencers in modern television. That influence will only grow with his new, record-breaking contract at Netflix. We will use Murphy as an example of a "creative voice," how a show-runner shapes and launches series, and the way Ryan Murphy has been a groundbreaker with the characters he's put in front of the camera, as well as the crews he's put behind the camera.

RTVF 180Z (01), CRN 95555: VR/AR Creation Lab
This intensive lab is offered to students who are interested in developing an AR or VR project in a collaborative setting. The ideal student has either taken a game development or VR Storytelling course or is concurrently taking one in Fall 2018. The course will be run like an incubator whereby students will pitch ideas on day one, and begin working on their projects thereafter.  This course meets in the second half of the Fall 2018 term.
Cross listed with CSC 144F (01), CRN 96059; JRNL 180Z (01), CRN 95953.

Religion – RELI

RELI 140W (A), CRN 95820: (HP) Master of Suspicion
This course will explore the rebellions of revolutionary Jewish intellectuals against the pressures of modernity. We will explore how the fields of psychology, sociology, critique of political economy, semiology or political theory were platforms to show the shortcoming of a society that was simultaneously forcing their integration and resisting their inclusion.
Cross listed with JWST 101G (A), CRN 95821.

RELI 141F (A), CRN 95613: Dangerous Ideas
This course has multiple sections in multiple departments (see list below).  If any one of the sections listed below is closed, just register for another one.  They are all the same course and will meet together. 
Ideas matter. Concepts such as cultural identity, democracy, and religious liberty have inspired social movements, shaped ways of life and political systems, and dramatically influenced the lives of individuals. Concepts, such as race, capitalism, and consumerism play an important role in contemporary debates in the United States. But powerful ideas can be dangerous, creating turmoil by favoring one group over another, by destabilizing the status quo, or indeed by supporting the status quo when change is very much needed; sometimes they are also dangerous because of unanticipated implications or unintended consequences. 
This one-credit explores some of these powerful ideas and the way(s) in which they may be dangerous. Each week a faculty member from a different department in the liberal arts will explore a concept that has shaped human experience across time and space. Attendance is obligatory and a brief reflection paper at the end of the course will be required. Some weeks may also have short recommended reading assignments. However, no advance preparation for any lecture or class meeting will be necessary; there is no required reading! 
The course is available only on a pass/D+/D/fail basis.
Cross listed with ANTH 188K (A), CRN 95610; CLL 194 (A), CRN 95615; DRAM 110C (A), CRN 95611; HIST 006M (A), CRN 95612; PHI 051D (A), CRN 95545; SOC 189C (A), CRN 95614.

RELI 141P (01), CRN 95811: (HP) Pilgrimage and Psychogeography
The etymology of the English word "pilgrim" takes us back to the Latin word for foreigner, itself a construction from per and ager meaning "through the field". In this class we will study all three of these meanings – the long-established routes and rituals of religious pilgrimage (e.g. the hajj to Mecca, the Camino de Santiago, tirthayatra in India); the differentiation of pilgrimage, tourism, and journeys of asylum; and the reciprocal relationship of landscape and self-perception (psychogeography) as expressed in a contemporary body of literature on walking (Sinclair, Solnit, Self et al). We will read first-hand accounts of pilgrims (both medieval and modern), of refugees, of walkers, exploring different cultural conceptions of journeying and destination. But we will also walk ourselves, retracing a journey made by George Fox (the founder of the Quaker movement) in 1672 from Oyster Bay, Long Island to Flushing, Queens. This walk (to be completed in sections during the semester*) will marry archival research of local history with both an act of spiritual pilgrimage and an engaged practice of "deep topography" (i.e. the tracing of the past in the present).
*Students registered for this course will need to be able to commit two weekend days in addition to class hours.

RELI 141S (A), CRN 96223: (HP) Social Justice, Activism, and Jews
This course explores the different paths Jews have taken to transform their societies, revolutionize their contexts, and struggle for a just world. We will study ideas and practices from individuals and communities who have fought for economic, racial, sexual, political and environmental justice in the past and today. This course is an excellent fit for students interested in religion, sociology, history, Latin American and Caribbean Studies, Middle Eastern Studies, political science, LGBTQ+ studies, Afro-American studies, Law and Jewish studies among disciplines. 
Cross listed with JWST 101S (A), CRN 96220.

Sociology – SOC

SOC 189C (A), CRN 95614: Dangerous Ideas
This course has multiple sections in multiple departments (see list below).  If any one of the sections listed below is closed, just register for another one.  They are all the same course and will meet together. 
Ideas matter. Concepts such as cultural identity, democracy, and religious liberty have inspired social movements, shaped ways of life and political systems, and dramatically influenced the lives of individuals. Concepts, such as race, capitalism, and consumerism play an important role in contemporary debates in the United States. But powerful ideas can be dangerous, creating turmoil by favoring one group over another, by destabilizing the status quo, or indeed by supporting the status quo when change is very much needed; sometimes they are also dangerous because of unanticipated implications or unintended consequences.
This one-credit explores some of these powerful ideas and the way(s) in which they may be dangerous. Each week a faculty member from a different department in the liberal arts will explore a concept that has shaped human experience across time and space. Attendance is obligatory and a brief reflection paper at the end of the course will be required. Some weeks may also have short recommended reading assignments. However, no advance preparation for any lecture or class meeting will be necessary; there is no required reading!
The course is available only on a pass/D+/D/fail basis.
Cross listed with ANTH 188K (A), CRN 95610; CLL 194 (A), CRN 95615; DRAM 110C (A), CRN 95611; HIST 006M (A), CRN 95612; PHI 051D (A), CRN 95545; RELI 141F (A), CRN 95613.

Spanish – SPAN

SPAN 180E (A), CRN 95547: Uncanny & Fantastic in Latin American Literature
This course analyzes in depth the presence of the fantastic genre in certain notable short stories by Latin American authors from the beginning of the twentieth century to the present. These stories denote the presence of unusual events, which can be supernatural or paranormal, arriving to acquire different levels of significance. Among the authors to study are: Leopoldo Lugones, Jorge Luis Borges (Argentina), Cesar Vallejo (Peru), Horacio Quiroga (Uruguay), Augusto Monterroso (Guatemala), G. García Márquez (Colombia), and Jose E. Pacheco (Mexico) ), among others.

Spanish Literature - SPLT

SPLT 050E (01), CRN 95548: (LT) Theory of Translation
This course will introduce students to some of the principal theories and practices of translation. We will consider translation from an array of different viewpoints, revising cultural, literary, and philosophical theories. We will examine the role played by translation in the creative process of contemporary writers, and will also consider interpreting (oral translation) in contexts such as immigration law.

Writing Studies and Composition – WSC

WSC 002 offers continued instruction in expository writing, and an introduction to writing in the disciplines of the humanities, social sciences, and natural sciences. Reading and writing assignments are organized around a central theme. You will find a description of central themes for the Fall 2018 semester below. Prerequisites (S)/Course Notes: WSC 001. May not be taken on a Pass/D+/D/Fail basis. The Writing Proficiency Exam is given as part of the course. (Formerly ENGL 2.)
If you have questions, please contact the Writing Studies and Composition Department at 463-5467. The department office is located in Mason Hall room 124.


Culture Clash and American Identity

002-02 CRN 92310 MW 2:55-4:20
002-18 CRN 93647 MW 12:50-2:15
L. Labalsamo

It is often said that America is a nation of immigrants. Some historians dispute this idea and label it a misleading myth. Whether we find the conceptualization of America as a nation of immigrants to be helpful or misleading, we cannot discount that immigration has had a particularly profound impact on how we view American identity because for many of us we are never simply American, but we are Irish-American, Haitian- American, Latino-American. Immigration has brought with it the challenges of culture clash, a term defined by Dictionary.com as "a conflict arising from the interaction of people with different cultural values." Examples of culture clash within the United States are fascinating to study, but what is equally fascinating is what happens to a specific person when this culture clash occurs within the confines of his/her own home, family or even mind. This is especially pertinent for first and second generation Americans. What happens when your parents' values contradict the values that surround you in the general culture? In this course, we will examine some examples of "internal" culture clash all while considering the concept of American identity and our own place within definitions of American identity. We will consider how beliefs about culture, language, race and genetics play into both American and ethnic identity. We will also consider how the current political environment may be impacting our ideas on all of this. Most importantly, this is a writing course so we will strive to strengthen our critical thinking, reading, researching and writing skills.

Who am I?—An Interdisciplinary Approach to Understanding Our Identities

002-02 CRN 92310 MW 2:55-4:20
002-18 CRN 93647 MW 12:50-2:15
V. Briscoe

What is identity? What directs who you are and the choices you make? Is our environment or our internal "make-up" what directs us to make the choices we do? In this course we will look at the historical, scientific, philosophical, and cultural factors that might determine our thinking about who we are and what develops our ideology. We will examine the cultural myths and realities that shape these decisions and question whether some of these factors are our decisions at all. We will also investigate how social stereotyping can often lead to the misuse and abuse of power, how beliefs about culture, language, race, gender, and genetics play into our personal and social identities, and how historical and current political environments impact our ideas on who we are. To answer these questions (and many more), our readings for the course will consist of interdisciplinary texts examining the varied intersections culturally and physically that define who we are and what choices we make in our lives through reading responses, class discussion, and composition. The composition portion of the course will focus on students' continued practice in developing thesis and argument through each stage of the composition process—discovery, organization, drafting, and revision. All major assignment assignments are designed to give students the proper grounding in academic writing, critical analysis, and argumentation.

Sleep and Dreams: An Inter-disciplinary Investigation

002-03 CRN 91439 MWF 12:50-1:45
002-23 CRN 94447 MWF 10:10-11:05
S. Jarvis

Sleep. All living things require it in some form or other. By rough estimate, human beings spend 1/3 of their lives doing it. Next to love, but more than money, we crave it most. You'd probably rather be doing it now than reading this, yes? So, to meet you half way, this semester our course theme is "Sleep and Dreams: An Inter-disciplinary Investigation." Readings for our course will consist of texts in the Natural Sciences (Biology, Neurology), Social Sciences (Anthropology, Psychology) and Humanities (Literature). We will engage with these texts through reading response, class discussion, and composition. The composition portion of our course will focus on students' continued practice in developing thesis and argument, through each stage of the composition process; discovery, organization, drafting and revision. All major assignments are designed to give students a proper grounding in the kinds of academic writing with which they will be engaged during their Hofstra careers.

The Business of Sports

002-05 CRN 91229 TR 9:35-11:00
M. Heiss

The influence that sports has on the world is the strongest it has ever been. Over the last 100 years, the world of sports has transformed from simple athletic competitions to a multi-billion dollar industry. From the clothes and shoes children wear to the boardrooms of Fortune 500 companies, the sports industry impacts people personally and globally. The Business of Sports will examine how athletes have gone from the semi-professional individual to purveyors of a global brand, and how industries have been created or modified to accommodate this new business world. Behind every sports hero, every winner, and every loser, is an army of people wrestling over dollars and television coverage. This section of WSC 2 will study the evolution of the sports world through interdisciplinary texts, multiple forms of media, and discussion of the industries that thrive behind the veneer of the sports world.

Sex, Drugs and Rock and Roll: The Woodstock Nation

002-09 CRN 92309 MW 4:40-5:55
002-06 CRN 91233 MW 2:55-4:20
W. Marinelli

The 60's: the decade that shaped a generation and a nation (and do I dare say, the world?) will be our theme for the semester. Hippies, Flower Children, Freaks, Flower Power, Free Love, The Summer of Love, Make Love Not War, Turn on, Tune in, and Drop out: all terms you've heard before. But "If you want to be experienced" as Jimi Hendrix once asked, burn your bras and draft cards and board our Magical Mystery Tour Bus for the "Trip" of your life.
In this section, we will study the 60's counter-culture revolution by reading Tom Wolfe's novel, The Electric Kool-Aid Acid Test and Abby Hoffman's book Woodstock Nation plus over twenty articles and by viewing the films Woodstock and Alice's Restaurant, as they relate to the Humanities, Social Sciences, and Natural Sciences disciplines.

Decisions! Decisions! Decisions!

002-10 CRN 91230 TR 9:35-11:00
002-13 CRN 91418 TR 11:10-12:35
R. Schaffer

The interactions and decisions of adolescents are often influenced by a combination of human nature, social interaction, and the physical environment. In this course, we will examine the complexities of human nature and how personal experiences and human interaction coupled with inborn characteristics often influence adolescents in the difficult task of making moral and ethical decisions.
Using readings and writings in the humanities, social sciences, and natural sciences, we will concentrate on this central theme and focus on critical reading, thinking, and writing. Through written essays, creative projects, and research, we will explore the intricacies of the adolescent mind.

Reality and Illusion

002-11 CRN 91281 TR 9:35-11:00
002-12 CRN 91231 TR 11:10-12:35
D. Friedlander

Continued instruction in expository writing, and an introduction to writing in the disciplines of the humanities, social sciences, and natural sciences. Reading and writing assignments are organized around a central theme.
In our case, that theme is "Reality and Illusion." We're going to explore what's real, how we create reality, and how we determine what's real and what's not. To that end, we'll be discussing works by Plato, Shakespeare, and others; exploring the ways in which the fine arts create or shape reality; reading essays about perception and the ways the mind determines what's real; and looking at how our reality can be shaped and determined by others. We will not be making in depth study. This is a writing course; we're going to focus on analysis and argumentation. So this will be an overview of the topic that will allow us to explore the issues of reality and illusion and allow you to write about them.

Land Use and the Environment

002-14 CRN 91553 TR 11:10-12:35
002-15 CRN 91437 TR 12:45-2:10
C. Anderson

The course will explore how we use and abuse the land on which we live, including the Hofstra campus and surrounding area. Field trips will include the Bird Sanctuary and other Hofstra locales. Readings are designed to match the theme, as well as the student's major area of interest.

Image of Everyday Life

002-16 CRN 93154 MW 2:55-4:20
E. Hynes-Musnisky

As members of American society, we are surrounded by images on a daily basis. Visual argument presents itself in numerous ways, from advertising and marketing to art and fashion, each competing in some way for our attentions. In this course, we will examine the role of the image in everyday life, both on campus and in society at large, reading images alongside written texts, and exploring the parallels between the two forms. We will discuss what it means to examine something as an "image," investigating how visual narratives and arguments are formed, composed, and realized. We will consider how images appeal to our senses and help us to make sense of our world.
Throughout the course, we will look at a variety of visual and written texts, including graffiti, tattoos, photography, visual art (including required visits to the Hofstra University Museum), advertising, and product packaging, as well as essays and criticism, in an effort to better understand the role of visual mediums in our everyday lives.

Parameters of the Mind

002-20 CRN 93953 TR 2:20-3:45
B. Bengels

This is first and foremost a writing course which will explore man's need to know the unknowable through the areas of fantasy, psychic phenomena, and scientific extrapolation. We will be reading learned essays by scientists such as astronomers and psychiatrists, social scientists such as anthropologists, psychologists, and sociologists, as well as some articles from magazines and newspapers. Some works of fiction and art will also help us explore how people have responded to what is real and what isn't. We will explore through the literature why a recent essay in NEWSWEEK suggested that high schools need to include in their science courses the analytic ability to discern "good" science from "Bad" science (referred to in the article as "BS.") It is important for every member of our society to be able to differentiate between what we'd like to believe in and what is actually possible if we are to make wise choices and be wise citizens. Too much is at stake if we don't.

Additional course descriptions will be added as they become available.

This course has multiple sections in multiple departments (see list below). If any one of the sections listed below is closed, just register for another one. They are all the same course, and will meet together.