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Greek Life

Hazing

Defined | Laws | Myth and Facts

Defined

Hazing has been defined as generally including, among other things:

  1. any action or situation which recklessly or intentionally endangers mental or physical health or involves the forced consumption of liquor or drugs for the purpose of initiation into or affiliation with any organization.
  2. any other act or series of acts which cause or are likely to cause mental or physical harm or danger.
  3. Mistreatment by playing stunts or practicing abusive, humiliating or abusive tricks that subject an individual to personal indignity, humiliation or ridicule.
  4. Harassment by enacting unnecessary, disagreeable or difficult work by banter, ridicule or criticism. Some examples of such activities include:
    • abnormal or unusual dress holding the wearer to ridicule, e.g. extraordinary headgear, costumes, underwear, body painting.
    • performing unusual or abnormal acts e.g., dancing on tables, standing at attention, standing on window sills, etc.
    • excessive or unusual physical exercise, e.g., crawling, duckwalk, pushups, situps, skipping, hopping, squatting, etc.
    • verbal harassment or abuse, e.g. yelling, making demeaning remarks, etc.
Adapted from Hofstra University Guide to Pride.

Laws

New York State Law
120.16. Hazing in the first degree

A person is guilty of hazing in the first degree when, in the course of another person's initiation into or affiliation with any organization, he or she intentionally or recklessly engages in conduct which creates a substantial risk of physical injury to such other person or a third person and thereby causes such injury.

Hazing in the first degree is a class A misdemeanor.

120.17. Hazing in the second degree
A person is guilty of hazing in the second degree when, in the course of another person's initiation or affiliation with any organization, he or she intentionally or recklessly engages in conduct which creates a substantial risk of physical injury to such other person or a third person.

Hazing in the second degree is a violation.

Civil Penalties
In addition to the consequences of violating University policies and state law prohibiting hazing, both individuals and chapters can be sued in civil court for mental or physical harm that results from hazing. Individual group members (and their parents), group leaders, advisors, the organization, and national affiliates may be sued. Hazing on college campuses has resulted in numerous successful lawsuits.