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Events

Fall 2016
Sep 19
7:00
(Cultural Ctr Theater)
DANIEL J. HICKS
“Science, Policy, and Controversy”
Dan Hicks is a philosopher and American Association for the Advancement of Science fellow at the National Science Foundation.
Sep 29
11:10
(142 Monroe)
DAVID HALPERIN
“Love and Desire in the Symposium
David Halperin is W.H. Auden Distinguished University Professor at University of Michigan.
Nov 9
7:00
(Cultural Ctr Theater)
ANJAN CHATTERJEE
“Beauty and the Brain”
Anjan Chatterjee is Elliott Professor and Chair of Neurology at Pennsylvania Hospital.
Dec 1
Philip Kitcher
(Cultural Ctr Theater)
PHILIP KITCHER
“Six Problems of Climate Change”
Philip Kitcher is John Dewey Professor of Philosophy at Columbia University.
Dec 7
11:15
(loc TBD)
JENNIFER ULEMAN
“The Freedom of the Void: On Kant, Hegel, Suicide, and Law”
Jennifer Uleman is an Associate Professor of Philosophy at SUNY Purchase College.
Spring 2017
Feb 8
12:00–1:00
(Heger Lounge)
MAJORS PIZZA EVENT
Get-together for philosophy majors, minors, and interested students.
Feb 22
11:15–12:45
(Davison 102)
GREGG CARUSO
“The Public Health Quarantine Model”
Gregg Caruso is Associate Professor of Philosophy at SUNY Corning and Co-Director of the Justice Without Retribution Network.
Mar 8
6:00–8:00
(Axinn Lower Level)
ASK A PHILOSOPHER
Discussion event for students and faculty.
Mar 15
6:15–7:45
(Heger Lounge)
REASONING EVENING
“Humans are Abduction Engines”
Anthony Dardis is a Professor of Philosophy at Hofstra.
Apr 5
11:15–12:45
(Heger 100)
IAN OLASOV
“How to Moralize: Some Simple Ways”
Ian Olasov is a graduate student at CUNY Grad Center.
Apr 12
6:15–7:45
(Heger Lounge)
REASONING EVENING
“From Micro Errors to Macro Failutres of Group/Institutional Judgment”
Roberto Mazzoleni is a Professor of Economics at Hofstra.
Apr 19
6:00–8:00
(Heger Lounge)
PHILOSOPHY STUDENT CONFERENCE
Students present their research.

For more information or to receive a paper, contact:
Joanne Herlihy.

Amie Thomasson- Fictionalism vs. Deflationism

There seem to be 3 main views about abstract objects (objects like properties, numbers, propositions, etc.): Platonism/realism (such things really do exist); eliminativism (there are no such things, and we can explain away apparent reference to them); and fictionalism (it's ok to talk about such things, but that's like fiction, it's not really true). There is a 4th option: deflationism. This view holds that the true things we say about abstract objects (there is a property Susanna's jacket has, being orange") are true in virtue of trivial transformations from unproblematic sentences ("Susanna's jacket is orange, therefore there is a property her jacket has, being orange").


Bob Hale- Properties and the interpretation of second-order logic

On a `thin' or `deflationary' account, a property is just what any meaningful predicate (a general word or expression) stands for. This paper discusses some consequences of this account, and shows how some objections may be countered.


Steve Yablo- Bandersnatches in Dubuque

How is it possible to say true things with names that do not refer, if the meaning of a name is the person to whom it refers? Given that Sherlock Holmes is a fictional character, the name `Sherlock Holmes' does not refer, and so the sentence `Sherlock Holmes does not exist' must be meaningless. Yet it is clearly true! How can we make sense of this?