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First Year Connections

CLUSTERS

Clusters are sets of two or three classes, linked by a common theme, that fulfill general education requirements. Many of the clusters involve activities in New York City. By taking a few courses with the same group of students, you'll make friends more quickly, form study groups, and come to feel at home on the Hofstra campus. Note that many of the clusters are associated with a living-learning community in the Netherlands first-year residential complex; however, students may register for a cluster even if they do not choose to live in an associated living-living learning community.


HUMANITIES, PUBLIC POLICY, HISTORY

F1: Literature and Theater of NYC (Total = 11 s.h.)
Spend some of your first semester in the greatest city on earth! Students in this cluster take three courses: theater, English literature, and composition. The readings in the literature course are closely integrated with excursions to cultural sites and landmarks in Manhattan. The theater course introduces students to the depth and breadth of theater in New York City, with trips to several performances in and around Manhattan and a walking tour of the Broadway theater district. Both courses include lectures, discussions, and field trips to Manhattan museums and other venues. In all three courses, students reflect on and write about the theater and literature of NYC. The emphasis throughout is on getting to know the rich literary and theatrical scene that New York City has to offer.
Please note: To allow for trips into NYC, students must not enroll in any Tuesday or Thursday classes outside of this cluster. Some trips – the Highline, Brooklyn Bridge, Central Park –require a fair amount of walking. This cluster carries an additional $200 fee to defray the cost of venue tickets, entrance fees, and commuting into and around Manhattan; students should plan to purchase dinner on occasions when the cluster attends an evening performance. ENGL 10 and DRAM 1 satisfy University graduation requirements in the Humanities category; WSC 1 (or its equivalent) is required of all students. Students who receive transfer credit for WSC 1 can register for the cluster without the WSC 1 component. This cluster is associated with the L.I.V.E. NYC living-learning community. Visit hofstra.edu/livelearn for information.

ENGL 10, sec. F1: Introduction to Literary Study (LT), (4 s.h.), CRN 92997  
T/TH, 12:45-2:45 p.m., Scott Harshbarger
and
DRAM 1, sec. F1: Theater Appreciation (AA), (4 s.h.), CRN 92315
T/TH, 3:30-5:30 p.m., Gary Mitchell
and
WSC 1, sec. F1: Composition (3 s.h.), CRN 92582
M/W/F, 12:50-1:45 p.m., Marc Prinz

F2: Democracy, Politics, and Policy: What's Fair in the United States? (Total = 12 s.h.)
This cluster examines values, politics, and policymaking in the United States. It focuses on three themes: the philosophical foundations of democratic governance, the challenges of policymaking in 21st century American politics, and prospects for alternative U.S. democratic governance structures. We begin by studying the values that govern American politics. How have they evolved since the late 18th century? We then take up the values, institutions, and interests that shape policymaking debates such as immigration, health care reform, and budgetary priorities. We conclude by considering how different institutional and philosophical approaches to American democracy might change our politics and our policies. Students participate in political and policy-related events on campus, and, through Hofstra's Peter S. Kalikow Center for the Study of the American Presidency, we have special opportunities to speak informally with distinguished guest speakers. This cluster includes one semester hour of LIBR 1: Introduction to Library and Information Technology. LIBR 1 is a distance learning course that introduces students to college-level research practices.
Please note: PHI 15 and PSC 1 satisfy University graduation requirements in the Social Sciences category; LIBR 1 satisfies part of the Liberal Arts requirement; WSC 1 (or its equivalent) is required of all students. Students who receive transfer credit for WSC 1 can register for the cluster without the WSC 1 component.

PHI 15, sec. F2: Law, Philosophy, and Public Life (HP), (4 s.h.), CRNs 93072 and 91623 
M/W/F, 1:20-2:35 p.m., Amy Baehr
and
PSC 1, sec. F2: American Politics (BH), (4 s.h.), CRN 91118
T/TH, 10:05 a.m.-noon, Meenekshi Bose
and

WSC 1, sec. F2: Composition (3 s.h.), CRN 95588
T/TH, 11:10 a.m.-12:35 p.m., Daisy Miller
or
WSC 1, sec. FB: Composition (3 s.h.), CRN 91223
T/TH, 12:45-2:10 p.m., Daisy Miller

COMMUNICATIONS, PHILOSOPHY, SOCIOLOGY

F4: Journalism, Media, and Society (Total = 10 s.h.)
America's founders were committed to the idea of a free press. The hope was that democracy could be best protected if a vibrant tradition of independent/professional journalism informed citizens about public issues and kept a careful eye on the nation's power holders. Today, "the media" are a hi-tech, 24/7, globalized, interlocking set of institutions that have complex relationships with corporations, countries, and citizens. This cluster examines the historical trajectory of media development as embedded in major social systems and explores the social and political roles of media from colonial times to the present. The media interact in distinctive ways with individuals and groups as we act as voters, consumers, workers, family members, even protesters. We explore how "the media" construct the way we view our public issues, our social life, even our notion of self. We pay particular attention to how media developments contribute to the maintenance of existing power relations as well as create new power.
Please note: MASS 1 is required of all communications majors; SOC 4 satisfies a University graduation requirement in the Social Sciences category; and WSC 1 (or its equivalent) is required of all students. Students who receive transfer credit for WSC 1 can register for the cluster without the WSC 1 component. This cluster is associated with the Communications living-learning community. Visit hofstra.edu/livelearn for information.

SOC 4, sec. F4: Contemporary Society (BH), (4 s.h.), CRN 92585
T/TH, 2:15-4:10 p.m., Cynthia Bogard
and
MASS 1, sec. F4: Mass Media: History and Development (3 s.h.), CRN 92959
T/TH, 4:30-5:55 p.m., Brian McFadden                      
and
WSC 1, sec. F4: Composition (3 s.h.), CRN 92583
M/W, 4:30-5:55 p.m., Robert Plath

F5: Film and Philosophy (Total = 10 s.h.)
This cluster integrates introductory courses in film and philosophy with first-year composition. The film course introduces the basic language of filmic expression and the methodologies of film study, including their influence on television and video. Emphasis is on ways of looking at films and television, the major concepts of theory, the various forms of film and television, and the techniques that determine visual styles. In the philosophy course students consider whether film is a passive mirror of a pre-existing reality, or whether we should think of it as possessing the power to actively construct a reality of its own. Can film be morally or socially dangerous? In the composition course students write in a variety of genres about their work in the other two courses.
Please note: RTVF 10 satisfies a University graduation requirement in the Humanities category; PHI 10 satisfies a University graduation requirement in the Social Sciences category; and WSC 1 (or its equivalent) is required of all students. Students who receive transfer credit for WSC 1 can register for the cluster without the WSC 1 component. This cluster is associated with the Studio living-learning community. Visit hofstra.edu/livelearn for information.

RTVF 10, sec. F5: Introduction to Cinema Studies (AA), (3 s.h.), CRN 91163
M/W, 12:45-2:45 p.m., Isabelle Freda          
and
PHI 10, sec. F5: Introduction to Philosophy (HP), (4 s.h.), CRN 93398
T/TH, 2:15-4:10 p.m., Amy Karofsky
and

WSC 1: Composition, sec. F5 (3 s.h.), CRN 91366
M/W/F, 9:05-10 a.m., John DeCarlo
or
WSC 1: Composition, sec. FE (3 s.h.), CRN 91726
M/W/F, 10:10-11:05 a.m., John DeCarlo

F6: Film Studies and Production (Total = 9 s.h.)

This cluster is intended primarily for film majors, or for other RTVF majors with an interest in film. This cluster combines the critical analysis of film aesthetics and narrative form (RTVF 10) with the practical application of those same principles in the students' own short film projects (RTVF 27). By taking the first two film requirements together as a cluster, students begin to form connections with each other as a community — a "network" that will benefit them throughout their studies.

Please note: Both RTVF 10 and RTVF 27 are required of all film majors or RTVF majors with an interest in film. This cluster is associated with the Studio living-learning community. Visit hofstra.edu/livelearn for information.

RTVF 10, sec. F6: Introduction to Cinema Studies (AA), (3 s.h.), CRN 91159
M/W, 9:05-11:05 a.m., Rodney Hill
and

RTVF 27, sec. F6: Introductory Film Production (3 s.h.), CRN 93115
T/TH 9:35-11:05 a.m., William Jennings
or
RTVF 27, sec. FF: Introductory Film Production (3 s.h.), CRN 91175
T/TH 12:45-2:10 p.m., William Jennings

BUSINESS, ECONOMICS, PSYCHOLOGY

F7: Law and Economics (Total = 9 s.h.)
What is the relationship between law, economics, and business? The legal studies in business course examines the sources of American law and the ways in which our legal system affects our business and personal lives. The class focuses on the Constitution, statutory law, common law, and administrative law. The economics course asks the following questions: What is capitalism? Why are the property relations and legal and political institutions so crucial to the operation of a capitalist economy? How have the legal forms of business and the overall business structure evolved over time? What challenges do global corporations create for policymakers?
Please note: Both ECO 2 and LEGL 20 are required of all business majors; WSC 1 (or its equivalent) is required of all students. Students who receive transfer credit for WSC 1 can register for the cluster without the WSC 1 component. This cluster is associated with the Zarb living-learning community. Visit hofstra.edu/livelearn for information.

ECO 1, sec. F7: Principles of Economics I (Macroeconomics) (3 s.h.), CRN 92060
M/W/F, 1:55-2:50 p.m., Massoud Fazel       
and
LEGL 20, sec. F7: Introduction to Legal Systems, Environment, and Contracts (3 s.h.), CRN 91694
T/TH, 12:45-2:10 p.m., Martha Weisel
and
WSC 1, sec. F7: Composition (3 s.h.), CRN 92336
M/W/F, 10:10-11:05 a.m., Jennifer Marx

F8: Money on my Mind: Economics and Psychology (Total = 10 s.h.)
Everyday life revolves around choice: Why did you decide to take this course? How much would you pay for a sandwich, a car, or an education? How do people choose to help or harm others, to cooperate or compete with them?  Many subtle factors actually influence our perceptions, behaviors, and choices. The integration of psychology and economics, often referred to as behavioral economics, seeks to explore those factors by studying choice, learning, and the goals of human actions individually and collectively. This cluster includes introductory courses in psychology and microeconomics, and first-year composition. The psychology course explores the underlying factors that influence how we learn, remember, make decisions, form relationships, deal with stress, and perceive the world. The economics course introduces students to major themes in microeconomics, such as how prices and other influences affect the choices of consumers and business firms, and how markets and other governance structures promote the coordination of economic activities in a complex society.

Please note: ECO 2 is required of all economics and business administration majors; PSY 1 is required of all psychology, neuroscience, and exercise science majors; WSC 1 (or its equivalent) is required of all students. Students who receive transfer credit for WSC 1 can register for the cluster without the WSC 1 component.

ECO 2, sec. F8: Principles of Economics II (Microeconomics) (3 s.h.), CRN 91064
M/F, 11:15 a.m.-12:40 p.m., Roberto Mazzoleni        
and
PSY 1, sec. F8: Introduction to Psychology (4 s.h.), CRN 94243
T/TH, 4:30-6:25 p.m., Emily Barkley-Levenson
and

WSC 1, sec. F8: Composition (3 s.h.), CRN 91727
T/TH, 9:35-11 a.m., Margaret Stein
or
WSC 1, sec. FH: Composition (3 s.h.), CRN, 91550
T/TH, 11:10 a.m.-12:35 p.m., Margaret Stein

PERFORMING ARTS

F9: Elements of Music (Total = 8 or 9 s.h.)
This cluster is designed for music majors, music education majors, or music minors, but is also suitable for non-majors with strong musical backgrounds. MUS 48 is a survey of the elements of music, the main formal structures, and the principal musical genres found in the various style periods of Western music. MUS 61 and 61A are intensive and comprehensive courses dealing with harmonic dictation, sight singing, and rhythmic training. (Students are placed in either MUS 61 or 61A based on their scores on Hofstra's music theory placement test.) In WSC 1, students write on themes and topics developed in the two music classes.
Please note: MUS 48 satisfies a University graduation requirement in the Humanities category; WSC 1 (or its equivalent) is required of all students. Students who receive transfer credit for WSC 1 can register for the cluster without the WSC 1 component. This cluster is associated with the S.T.A.G.E. living-learning community. Visit hofstra.edu/livelearn for information.

MUS 48, sec. F9: Musical Styles and Structures (AA), (3 s.h.), CRN 90093
T/TH, 2:20-3:45 p.m., Christopher Morrongiello
and

MUS 61, sec. F9: Elementary Ear Training (2 s.h.), CRN 90633
M/F, 9:05-10 a.m., Lisa Behrens
or
MUS 61A, sec. F9: Elementary Ear Training (3 s.h.), CRN 91443
M/W/F, 9:05-10 a.m., Sarah Loudon

and

WSC 1, sec. F9: Composition (3 s.h.), CRN 92013
T/TH, 9:35-11 a.m., Rory McDonough
or
WSC 1, sec. FI: Composition (3 s.h.), CRN 92014
T/TH, 11:10 a.m.-12:35 p.m., Rory McDonough

F10: This Great Stage (Total = 9 s.h.)
This cluster is ideal for students who are considering a major or minor in drama. It includes DRAM 9 and ENGL 115, both required courses for the major. Students explore representative plays from a wide variety of traditions as an access point to a larger discussion about the development of Western drama from the ancient Greeks to the present day, with a particular emphasis on Shakespeare. Assignments focus on sharpening and refining analytical and observational skills through discussion, lecture, and writing. By the end of the semester, students will have gained an overview of the history of Western drama and they will have developed their writing skills through integrated assignments.
Please note: Both DRAM 9 and ENGL 115 are required of all drama majors; ENGL 115 satisfies a University graduation requirement in the Humanities category; and WSC 1 (or its equivalent) is required of all students. Students who receive transfer credit for WSC 1 can register for the cluster without the WSC 1 component. This cluster is associated with the S.T.A.G.E. living-learning community. Visit hofstra.edu/livelearn for information.

DRAM 9, sec. F10: Play Analysis (3 s.h.), CRN 90636
T/TH, 9:35-11 a.m., Christopher Dippel
and
ENGL 115, sec F10: Shakespeare (LT), (3 s.h.), CRN 90538
T/TH, 11:10 a.m.-12:35 p.m., Maureen McFeely
and
WSC 1, sec. F10: Composition (3 s.h.), CRN 91224
M/W, 2:55-4:20 p.m., Jennifer Rich

F11: Modern Dance (Total = 8-10 s.h.)
This cluster is designed for incoming majors in dance or dance education. DNCE 11 focuses on technique in contemporary dance forms, and it is the first course in a four-year major sequence. Students in the Bachelor of Arts track meet three times a week for DNCE 11; students in the Bachelor of Fine Arts track meet five times a week for DNCE 11. Students in both tracks must take MUS 151, which is a study of musical concepts as they apply to dance, and a composition class, in which writing assignments are connected to dance criticism. Students attend a variety of dance and music performances in New York City during the semester.
Please note: DNCE 11 satisfies a University graduation requirement in the Humanities category; WSC 1 (or its equivalent) is required of all students. Students who receive transfer credit for WSC 1 can register for the cluster without the WSC 1 component. This cluster is associated with the S.T.A.G.E. living-learning community. Visit hofstra.edu/livelearn for information.

BA and BFA Tracks:

DNCE 11, sec. FC: Freshman Performance Lab, CRN 91352
W, 12:45-2:10 p.m., Robin Becker
and
MUS 151, sec. F11: Rhythmic Training and Accompaniment for Dance (3 s.h.), CRN 93687
T/TH, 4-5:25 p.m., Glen Fittin and Kyle Maxwell-Doherty
and
WSC 1, sec. F11: Composition (3 s.h.), CRN 91222
T/TH, 2:20-3:45 p.m., Michael Heiss
and

BA Track:

DNCE 11, sec. FA: Modern Dance I (CP), (2 s.h.), CRN 91351
T/TH, 9:35-11 a.m., Robin Becker
or
DNCE 11, sec. FB: Modern Dance I (CP), (2 s.h.), CRN 93936
T/TH, 11:10 a.m.-12:35 p.m., Robin Becker

BFA Track:

DNCE 11, sec. FAX: Modern Dance I (CP), (4 s.h.), CRN 94282
T/TH, 9:35-11 a.m., Robin Becker
M/F, 12:50-2:15 p.m., Robert Cook
or
DNCE 11, sec. FBX: Modern Dance I (CP), (4 s.h.), CRN 94283
T/TH, 11:10 a.m.-12:35 p.m., Robin Becker
M/F, 12:50-2:15 p.m., Robert Cook

ENGINEERING, COMPUTING, PRE-HEALTH SCIENCES  

ENGINEERING
F12: Engineering (Total = 6 s.h.)
This cluster explores the world that humans have designed — the products and processes used in its development. There are three main components of the first-year engineering design course. First, the informed design process connects basic science and mathematics to an eight-step design cycle that enables students to grasp the basics of conceptual engineering design. Second, teamwork is emphasized: Students collaborate on homework and compete with other teams in designing lab projects. Third, communication skills are explored and developed through problem-solving activities and brainstorming sessions. Class sessions are composed of rich media content, including Flash animations, video clips, graphic images, music, and active learning methods to enhance student involvement. Five lab projects allow teams to design and build their own prototypes within project specifications and time constraints, develop good interpersonal team dynamics, and improve their oral and written communication skills.
Please note: ENGG 15 satisfies a University graduation requirement in the Natural Sciences category; WSC 1 (or its equivalent) is required of all students. Students who receive transfer credit for WSC 1 can register for the cluster without the WSC 1 component. This cluster is associated with the Math, Science, and Engineering living-learning community. Visit hofstra.edu/livelearn for information.

ENGG 15, sec. F12: Designing the Human-Made World (NS), (3 s.h.), CRN 91927
M/W, 12:50-1:45 p.m., Mauro Caputi
and

ENGG 15 Lab, sec. FAL, CRN 90844
M, 2:20-4:20 p.m., Mauro Caputi
or
ENGG 15 Lab, sec. FBL, CRN 90845
W, 2:20-4:20 p.m., Mauro Caputi
or
ENGG 15 Lab, sec. FCL, CRN 90843
F, 12:50-2:50 p.m., Mauro Caputi
or
ENGG 15 Lab, sec. FDL, CRN 91886
T, 2:20-4:20 p.m., Mauro Caputi
or
ENGG 15 Lab, sec. FEL, CRN 91987
TH, 2:20-4:20 p.m., Mauro Caputi
or
ENGG 15 Lab, sec. FFL, CRN 91986
TH, 5:20-7:20 p.m., Mauro Caputi
or
ENGG 15 Lab, sec. FGL, CRN 92812
T, 5:20-7:20 p.m., Mauro Caputi

and

WSC 1, sec. FAL: Composition (3 s.h.), CRN 91225
T/TH, 2:20-3:45 p.m., Aisha Wilson Carter
or
WSC 1, sec. FBL: Composition (3 s.h.), CRN 91226
T/TH, 2:20-3:45 p.m., Daniel Cole
or
WSC 1, sec. FDL: Composition (3 s.h.), CRN 91725
T/TH, 11:10 a.m.-12:35 p.m., Daniel Cole
or
WSC 1, sec. FEL: Composition (3 s.h.), CRN 92016
T/TH, 9:35-11 a.m., Daniel Cole
or
WSC 1, sec. FFL: Composition (3 s.h.), CRN 92993
T/TH, 11:10 a.m.-12:35 p.m., Aisha Wilson Carter

F13: Computer Science: Machines – Math, Logic and Programming (Total = 7 s.h.)

The field of artificial intelligence (AI) aims at developing "thinking machines" – intelligent computer systems that can sense, reason, plan, act, and even feel like humans. Recently, advances in robotics and large-scale systems, machine learning, computational linguistics, computer vision, dynamic systems, neuroscience, and cognitive science have given computer scientists new hope in the quest to reproduce human intelligence. Researchers are now poised to address the main challenge of creating "general AI." In this cluster we start the journey by building the foundations in mathematics and computer science on which all computer programs are built – including those that are capable of AI. Along the way, through research and discussions, we highlight the people, ideas, and events that shaped AI, and explore its frontiers.

CSC 14, sec. F13: Discrete Structures for Computer Science I (CS, MA), (3 s.h.), CRN 92523
Lecture, M/W, 12:50-2:15 p.m.; Lab, T, 12:45-1:40 p.m.; Gerda Kamberova
and
CSC 15, sec. F13 and FAL: Fundamentals of Computer Science (CS), (4 s.h.), CRNs 92661 and 92662
Lecture, M/W, 2:55-4:20 p.m.; Lab, T, 4-5:50 p.m.; Chuck Liang

F14: Introduction to Computing: Cryptography (Total = 7 s.h.)
Cryptography, the study of making codes, is simultaneously ancient and modern. It is said that Julius Caesar used codes to communicate with his generals on the battlefield so that even if a messenger was waylaid by enemies, they would not understand what the messenger was trying to communicate. In modern times cryptography is an essential ingredient in the success of the internet. Some cryptographic techniques ensure that an eavesdropper cannot steal your credit card number as it is transmitted from your computer to an online retailer. Other cryptographic techniques ensure that an app that you downloaded was actually created by the company stated on the website. Yet others ensure that your electronic medical records are safe from prying eyes. Besides some interesting ideas in cryptography, this cluster explores the foundations of computing, both applied and theoretical, and teaches a new way of thinking: computational thinking. In CSC 15 you will receive an introduction to Bitcoin, a type of digital currency based on cryptographic techniques. In-class examples and homework assignments illustrate how simple programming constructs can be combined to solve complex problems. In CSC14 you will explore the mathematical underpinnings of cryptography while gaining a comprehensive understanding of fundamental problems in computer science.
Please note: Priority is given to computer science and computer engineering majors, but non-majors are welcome. CSC 14 and CSC 15 satisfy University graduation requirements in the Mathematics and Computer Science categories. This cluster is associated with the Math, Science, and Engineering living-learning community. Visit hofstra.edu/livelearn for information.

CSC 14, sec. F14: Discrete Structures for Computer Science I (CS, MA), (3 s.h.), CRN 93101
T/TH, 2:15-4:10 p.m., Gretchen Ostheimer
and
CSC 15, sec. F14 and FBL: Fundamentals of Computer Science (CS), (4 s.h.), CRNs 90968 and 90969
Lecture, M/F, 11:15-12:40 a.m.; Lab, T, 9-10:50 a.m.; Krishnan Pillaipakkamnatt

F15: Pre-Health Sciences: Biology Focus (Total = 7 s.h.)

Medical, dental, and veterinary schools require a solid foundation in the life sciences. This cluster focuses on providing an introduction to college-level study in the biological sciences, through an exploration of animal form and function. Lessons on best practices for learning and studying these concepts are embedded in the class discussions. Throughout the cluster, we consider how various biological processes drive animal behavior and function and also influence the human condition. This cluster includes first-year composition (WSC 1), which emphasizes personal expression as well as writing about topics in health.
Please note: This cluster carries an additional $50 laboratory fee. BIO 12 satisfies a University graduation requirement in the Natural Sciences category; WSC 1 (or its equivalent) is required of all students. Students who receive transfer credit for WSC 1 can register for the cluster without the WSC 1 component. This cluster is associated with the Pre-Health Professions living-learning community. Visit hofstra.edu/livelearn for information.

BIO 12, sec. F15: Animal Form and Function (NS), (4 s.h.), CRN 93021
M/W/F, 9:05-10 a.m., Jessica Santangelo
and

BIO 12 Lab, sec. FAL, CRN 91523
W, 2:20-5:20 p.m., Jessica Santangelo
or
BIO 12 Lab, sec. FBL, CRN 93022
TH, 2:20-5:20 p.m., Jessica Santangelo

and
WSC 1, sec. F15: Composition (3 s.h.), CRN 92991
T/TH, 11:10 a.m.-12:35 p.m., Lisa DeTora

F16: Pre-Health Sciences: Biology and Chemistry (Total = 11 s.h.)
Most medical, dental, and veterinary schools require a solid foundation in science, particularly biology and chemistry. After all, organisms are massive collections of biological molecules executing complex combinations of chemical reactions in a highly controlled and regulated manner. This cluster explores general chemistry, animal form and function, and the interplay between these disciplines in the function of organisms, particularly humans. Throughout the cluster, we consider how various chemical and biological processes are related and influence the human condition. This cluster includes first-year composition (WSC 1), which emphasizes personal expression as well as writing about topics in health.
Please note: This cluster carries an additional $70 laboratory fee. BIO 12 and CHEM 3A satisfy University graduation requirements in the Natural Sciences category; WSC 1 (or its equivalent) is required of all students. Students who receive transfer credit for WSC 1 can register for the cluster without the WSC 1 component. This cluster is associated with the Pre-Health Professions living-learning community. Visit hofstra.edu/livelearn for additional information.

BIO 12, sec. F16: Animal Form and Function (NS), (4 s.h.), CRN 91521
M/W/F, 9:05-10 a.m., Nicholas Santangelo
and
CHEM 3A, sec. F16: General and Inorganic Chemistry (NS), (3 s.h.), CRN 90821
M/W/F, 10:10-11:05 a.m., and TH, 8:30-9:25 a.m., Kevin Bisceglia
and

BIO 12 Lab, sec. FCL, CRN 91522
M, 2:20-5:20 p.m., TBA
and
CHEM 3B Lab, sec. FA (NS), (1 s.h.), CRN 90010
W, 2:20-5:10 p.m., Terry Brack
and
WSC 1, sec. FP: Composition (3 s.h.), CRN 91551
T/TH, 2:20-3:45 p.m., Kristopher Lotier

or

BIO 12 Lab, sec. FDL, CRN 93073
T, 2:20-5:20 p.m., Nicholas Santangelo
and
CHEM 3B Lab, sec. FB (NS), (1 s.h.), CRN 90568
TH, 2:20-5:10 p.m., Ronald Strothkamp
and
WSC 1, sec. F16: Composition (3 s.h.), CRN 93641
T/TH, 11:10 a.m.-12:35 p.m., Kristopher Lotier