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First Year Connections

SEMINARS

Seminars are small classes – limited to 19 students – that fulfill graduation requirements. Many of the seminars involve activities in New York City. Seminars are an excellent way to connect with peers and faculty in a relaxed and friendly setting.

ANTHROPOLOGY

1. ANTH 14F, sec. 01: Darwin: The Person and his Revolutionary Idea (BH), 3 s.h.
T/TH, 9:35-11 a.m., Bradley Phillippi
CRN 95256
Charles Darwin is best known for his theory of natural selection and contributions to our understanding of evolution, but very few know about the drama surrounding his life and research. This course offers students the chance to learn about the circumstances that enabled, inspired, and obstructed Darwin, including the growing conflict between spiritual faith and scientific explanation. We examine the personal trials, tribulations, and failures that led him to join an epic five-year global voyage on the HMS Beagle and his later struggle with reconciling his theory with his own beliefs of divine creation. His theory inspired many and antagonized others, and we review some of the ideas and events that transpired before and after his death in 1882. Part of this course includes a class trip to the American Museum of Natural History, where students get a chance to view some of Darwin's contributions to anthropology, geology, and paleontology.
Please note: This course satisfies a University graduation requirement in the Social Sciences category.

2. ANTH 14F, sec. 02: Forensic Anthropology: Bones, Bodies, and Burials (BH, CC), 3 s.h.
T/TH, 11:10 a.m.-12:35 p.m., Kristen Hartnett-McCann
CRN 95257
This course evaluates popular depictions of forensic science and forensic anthropology and explores the diverse roles of a forensic anthropologist in a modern, medicolegal setting. Students participate in hands-on skeletal analyses, case studies, and mock crime scenes. Contemporary topics such as human rights, serial killers, mass fatalities, and ethics of human subjects research are investigated through readings and discussions.
Please note: This course satisfies a University graduation requirement in either the Social Sciences or Cross-Cultural category.

ART HISTORY

3. AH 14F, sec. 01: Life in Art (AA), 4 s.h.
T/TH, 4:30-5:55 p.m., Aleksandr Naymark
CRN 95306
This course, which combines lectures with feature and documentary films, covers artistic biographies of 15 great masters of European tradition: Leonardo, Michelangelo, Rafael, Titian, El Greco, Caravaggio, Bernini, Artemisia Gentileschi, Rembrandt, Vermeer, David, Goya, Turner, Friedrich, and Delacroix. The works of each artist are discussed with regard to the general developments taking place in European art from the 15th century to the first half of the 19th century. In addition to regular class meetings at Hofstra, there will be periodic field trips to NYC museums such as The Cloisters, The Hispanic Society of America, The Metropolitan Museum of Art, and The Frick Collection. This seminar includes one semester hour of LIBR 1: Introduction to Library and Information Technology. LIBR 1 is a distance learning course that introduces students to college-level research practices.
Please note: This course satisfies a University graduation requirement in the Humanities; LIBR 1 satisfies part of the Liberal Arts requirement.

ASTRONOMY

4. ASTR 14F, sec. A and AL: Cosmic Explosions: The Cataclysmic Lives of Stars and Galaxies (NS), 3 s.h.
Lecture, M, 4:05-5:55 p.m.; Lab, W, 4:05-5:55 p.m.; Christina Lacey
CRNs 92295 and 92296
This course investigates the birth and lives of stars, including stars like our sun. We study how stars produce energy and how some stars die with a whimper and some die spectacularly in massive supernova explosions. From there we talk about galaxies that are composed of these stars and the supermassive black holes that lurk at the hearts of most galaxies.
Please note: This course satisfies a University graduation requirement in the Natural Sciences category.

5. ASTR 14F, sec. B and BL: Getting to Know Our Solar System: From the Ancient Greeks to Interstellar Life (NS), 3 s.h.
Lecture, T, 2:20-4:10 p.m.; Lab, TH, 2:20-4:10 p.m.; Brett Bochner
CRNs 92033 and 92034
In this survey of our solar system, we discuss the evolution of ideas about the nature of our world, and the structure of our cosmos – from visions of an Earth-centered universe, to the modern view of Earth as a small, blue dot in the vast Milky Way galaxy. This seminar covers the sun, the planets, and their moons, plus the small, wandering asteroids and "plutoids" orbiting in the empty places of the solar system – all of which formed very simply from a wispy cloud of dust and gas brought together by gravity. We also learn about planets orbiting other stars in other solar systems, and consider the possibility of extraterrestrial life in all of these places, far beyond the boundaries of our home on Earth. Students are required to attend several evening telescope observing sessions during the semester at the Hofstra Observatory.
Please note: This course satisfies a University graduation requirement in the Natural Sciences category.

COMPARATIVE LITERATURE

6. CLL 14F, sec. 01: Rebellion and Self-Creation in Literature (LT), 4 s.h.
M/F, 11:15 a.m.-12:40 p.m., John Krapp
CRN 93053
Throughout our lives, we are told how to think, how to act, how to feel in this world. The voice of authority, whether from a person or an institution, writes our script, and we are expected to play our part. Following the rules makes us good citizens, good souls. But some people break the rules. They think, act, and feel in ways that pit them against authority. These people often make their lives difficult and extraordinary through such choices. Even more, they may force a change in the way others see the world. They may even undermine the power of institutional authority. In this course, we look at a variety of texts where people challenge authority. We look at the historical spaces these people occupy, the way they rebel against these ideologies, and the consequences of their acts of rebellion. This seminar includes one semester hour of LIBR 1: Introduction to Library and Information Technology. LIBR 1 is a distance learning course that introduces students to college-level research practices.
Please note: This course satisfies a University graduation requirement in the Humanities category; LIBR 1 satisfies part of the Liberal Arts requirement.

DRAMA

7. DRAM 14F, sec. 01: Broadway (and More!) (AA), 4 s.h.
T/TH, 12:10-2:05 p.m., Edward Elefterion
CRN 92996
Tourists sometimes think theater in New York City means Broadway and nothing else. But New York City also boasts hundreds of exciting off-Broadway and indie productions each season. This drama seminar ventures beyond the classroom to explore the rich variety of these stage offerings. By seeking good theater in all its guises – on Broadway and off, commercial and not-for-profit – we come to understand what makes New York the theater capital of the world.
Please note: To allow for trips into NYC, students should not enroll in Thursday classes that end after 3:45 p.m. This seminar carries an additional $100 fee to defray the cost of theater tickets and travel to and from NYC throughout the semester. This course satisfies a University graduation requirement in the Humanities category; it does not satisfy the DRAM 3 requirement for drama majors. This course is associated with the L.I.V.E. NYC living-learning community. Visit hofstra.edu/livelearn for information.

ECONOMICS

8. ECO 14F, sec. 01: Macro Freakonomics (BH), 4 s.h.
M/W/F, 9:50-11:05 a.m., Massoud Fazeli
CRN 91339
What caused the financial crash of 2008 and the subsequent Great Recession? How can there be a "jobless recovery"? What are the real threats – if any – of globalization? Why is there so much protest and even rioting at World Bank meetings? This course goes behind the headlines and examines the underlying trends of the economy in order to understand the current crisis and the future of capitalism. It is taught in the spirit of the book Freakonomics.
Please note: This course satisfies a University graduation requirement in the Social Sciences category.

ENGLISH

9. ENGL 14F, sec. 01: Literature and the Environment (LT), 3 s.h.
M/W, 2:55-4:20 p.m., Lee Zimmerman
CRN 92589
What Einstein once said about the development of the atomic bomb is at least equally true about the contemporary climate crisis: It has "changed everything except our way of thinking, and thus we drift toward unparalleled catastrophe." This course explores that (unchanged) "way of thinking" and how it has seemed to normalize the human activity that, though producing the climate crisis, continues unabated. To do this, we examine our culturally predominant conceptions of "nature" and the "environment," and, especially, we explore how some suggestive literary texts illuminate they ways those terms have been understood. We also consider the degree to which our literary texts represent "ways of thinking" to challenge those ways that normalize our drift toward catastrophe. Our texts are drawn from a range of time periods, but the emphasis is on texts from the 20th and 21st centuries.
Please note: This course satisfies a University graduation requirement in the Humanities category.

10. ENGL 14F, sec. 02: Playing With Food: British Literature On and Off the Table (LT), 4 s.h.
M/W, 12:50-2:45 p.m., Irene Fizer
CRN 92590
Much of what we do is a matter of habit — patterns of behavior that are shaped by our upbringing, ethnic heritage, the foods that form our sense of taste (and distaste) during childhood, the arts and culture to which we are introduced in our early years, our formal education, and the media environments in which we are immersed. When do we feel compelled to alter these habits? Why do we begin to construct a new sense of self, to restructure our daily lives, and to acquire a different set of tastes, social bonds, and cultural affiliations? We consider questions like these, through the lens of literary texts such as Lewis Carroll's Alice's Adventures in Wonderland, Christina Rossetti's "Goblin Market," and George Orwell's Animal Farm, as well as through readings from a variety of disciplines such as advertising, anthropology, cultural history, gender studies, and media studies. In addition, we travel to NYC to take in a food tour of a New York City neighborhood, and to experience the ritual of tea-drinking in the city.
Please note: This course satisfies a University graduation requirement in the Humanities category.

11. ENGL 14F, sec. 3: I'll Take Manhattan: Myth and the City in Popular Culture (LT), 4 s.h.
T/TH, 2:15-4:10 p.m., Paula Uruburu
CRN 92588
New York City (aka Gotham City, the Big Apple, the Concrete Jungle) has been an inspiration for a wide range of writers, artists, and filmmakers. For many, Manhattan is a mythical place of historical memory, reinvention, and cultural diversity. In this course we analyze how representations of Manhattan comment on the meaning of identity and the complexity of the "New York state of mind" in films, graphic novels, fiction, and other representative works of art. 
Please note: This course satisfies a University graduation requirement in the Humanities category. This course is associated with the L.I.V.E. NYC living-learning community. Visit hofstra.edu/livelearn for information.

FINE ARTS

12. FA 14F, sec. 01: Off the Wall: Experimental Painting (CP), 3 s.h.
T/TH, 9:35-11 a.m., Stephen Keister
CRN 93532
This course combines aspects of painting and sculpture to produce hybrid artworks that are mounted on the wall. Cave paintings, among the earliest surviving works of art, incorporated the natural irregularities of the walls with two-dimensional images. Throughout art history, painting has extended into the third dimension in a great variety of applications, including the traditions of mosaic and the modern invention of collage. Students learn formal aspects of painting such as color, shape and composition, while being encouraged to experiment with new materials, paints and adhesives. Prior experience with painting and sculpture is not expected.
Please note. This course carries an additional $50 fee; this course satisfies a University graduation requirement in the Humanities category.

13. FA 14F, sec. 02: Man vs. Machine: Creating by Hand and by Computer (CP), 3 s.h.
M/W, 1-2:50 p.m., Alexander Roskin
CRN 94274
In the first half of the semester, students focus on learning how to use their hands to create art through a series of short assignments that build their skills with hand cutting and filing semiprecious metals. In the second half of the semester, students learn how to use a popular 3-D computer solid-modeling program to create an artwork, which will be fabricated using a 3-D printer. The final paper in the course considers these two different approaches of how we think with our hands to create art.
Please note. This course carries an additional $80 fee; this course satisfies a University graduation requirement in the Humanities category.

14. FA 14F, sec. 03: Infographics: Data Visualization (CP), 3 s.h.
T/TH, 3-4:50 p.m., Warren Infield
CRN 94275
In this design course we examine a range of visual solutions that translate simple and complex information into graphics and data visualizations that make the information more easily understandable from a historical, aesthetic, and contemporary perspective. An important aspect of the course is to create solutions to simple problems and ultimately culminate with complex material after we research and understand the content. This is a studio course that utilizes graphic programs to create solutions. Prior experience with graphic design programs is not expected.
Please note. This course carries an additional $80 fee; this course satisfies a University graduation requirement in the Humanities category.

15. FA 14F, sec. 04: Design, Business, and Innovation (CP), 4 s.h.
T/R, 2:15-4:10 p.m., Thomas Klinkowstein
CRN 95310
A new approach to business, called design thinking or innovation design, employs the processes of design as a tool to imagine new approaches to business, nonprofit organizations, and the future in general. This course introduces design fundamentals as well as the creative process as employed by companies like Apple and Nike. All students create proposals for new profit or nonprofit organizations with accompanying design and website or social media elements. No prior design, business, or computer experience is necessary; this course includes trips to design-related studio(s) or other design-related event(s) in New York City.
Please note. This course carries an additional $80 fee; this course satisfies a University graduation requirement in the Humanities category.

GEOLOGY

16. GEOL 14F, sec. 01 and 01L: Geology of NYC and Long Island (NS), 3 s.h.
Lecture, M/W, 12:50-1:45 p.m.; Lab, M, 4:30-6:20 p.m.; Steven Okulewicz
CRNs 91710 and 91711
Public health, public transportation, water works, and environmental protection affect our daily lives, and all depend on the subjects of geology and engineering. This seminar is conducted in a lecture and field trip format, and involves travel to various sites around New York City and Long Island. We see firsthand how science connects with public policy. Students learn to look at large-scale issues of public concern in New York City and on Long Island through the lens of the field geologist.
Please note: This course satisfies a University graduation requirement in the Natural Sciences category.

17. GEOL 14F, sec. 02 and 02L: Digging Dinosaurs (NS), 3 s.h.
Lecture, M/W, 2:55-3:45 p.m.; Lab, TH, 4:30-6:20 p.m.; J Brett Bennington
CRNs 94303 and 94304
Dinosaurs have roared back into evolutionary relevance as paleontologists unearth astonishing new fossils demonstrating that dinosaurs were dynamic, hot-blooded creatures that gave rise to birds. In this class we discuss how paleontologists find and study dinosaur fossils to reconstruct what these amazing animals were like over their 150-million-year reign on the Earth. We also examine the diverse range of animals that shared the world with dinosaurs, including giant marine reptiles and the pterosaurs – the first vertebrates to evolve flight.
Please note: This course satisfies a University graduation requirement in the Natural Sciences category.

HISTORY

18. HIST 14F, sec. 01: New York City Before and After 9/11 (HP), 4 s.h.
T/TH, 2:15-4:10 p.m., Mario Ruiz
CRN 93031
One of the common assumptions Americans share is that the Sept. 11 attacks on the World Trade Center changed New York City forever. In this course we examine this assumption by studying New York City before and after 9/11. In addition to studying the real and imagined events that led up to the Sept. 11 attacks, we study the development of New York City as a magnet for architecture, art, film, and tourism. We begin the course with the construction of the Empire State Building and conclude with personalized projects reflecting on the effects of the 9/11 attacks. Field trips in this course include visits to the Empire State Building, Hofstra's Sept. 11 Project Collection, and the 9/11 Memorial and Museum.
Please note: This course satisfies a University graduation requirement in the Social Sciences category.

19. HIST 14F, sec. 02: Immigrant Experiences (HP), 4 s.h.
M/W, 9:10-11:05 a.m., Katrina Sims  
CRN 93032
This course examines the experiences of immigrants on Long Island, New York. Since the 17th century when Dutch and English settlers inhabited the island, it has been occupied by diverse peoples with distinctly different religious practices, cultural traditions, ethnic identities, and languages. Over the course of the semester, students unearth the experiences of three of the largest immigrant populations on Long Island – Irish Americans, Italian Americans, and Jewish Americans. Additionally, we integrate the experiences of immigrants of the 20th and 21st centuries – Latino Americans and Haitian Americans. The multipronged approach includes exploration of archival documents ranging from personal letters to photographs, interviewing first-generation immigrants, and a walking tour of historic sites on Long Island.
Please note: This course satisfies a University graduation requirement in the Social Sciences category.

20. HIST 14F, sec. 03: War and Peace in Israel and Palestine (HP), 4 s.h.
M/W, 12:50-2:45 p.m., Johan Ahr
CRN 93033
This seminar explores the troubled, frequently violent relationship between Israel and Palestine since its beginning — before any question of statehood for either side. Will their ongoing battle for patrimony and territory, a war fueled by religion that pits Islam against Judaism, ever cease and culminate in mutually acceptable and lasting peace? Is a two-state solution still a possibility? In this seminar, documentaries, memoirs, and visits to museums in New York City inform our discussion of the parties in conflict and their positions. We consider the opinions not only of politicians, but also of people in the street, be they in Nablus or Tel Aviv — and rich or poor.
Please note: This course satisfies a University graduation requirement in the Social Sciences category.

21. HIST 14F, sec. A: From New Amsterdam to Levittown: A History of New York and Long Island, 17th-20th Centuries (HP), 5 s.h.
T/TH, 4:30-6:20 p.m., John Staudt
CRN 95378
Many significant historic events have taken place in New York City and on Long Island. For example, the first battle fought by the Continental Army took place in Brooklyn. Over 12 million immigrants entered the United States through Ellis Island. President Theodore Roosevelt was born in New York City and died in Oyster Bay. The Lunar Module that safely landed men on the moon was built in Bethpage. Artists include, among many others, William Sidney Mount and Andy Warhol and musicians Louis Armstrong and Joey Ramone. This course allows students to focus on the region's rich political, cultural, social, and economic past. It takes every opportunity to get students out into the community surrounding Hofstra to experience history as a living subject, with visits to regional historic sites, museums, and the natural surrounding environment. This seminar includes one semester hour of LIBR 1: Introduction to Library and Information Technology. LIBR 1 is a distance learning course that introduces students to college-level research practices.
Please note: This course satisfies a University graduation requirement in the Social Sciences category; LIBR 1 satisfies part of the Liberal Arts requirement.

LABOR STUDIES

22. LABR 14F, sec. 01: Micro Freakonomics (BH), 4 s.h.
T/TH, 2:15-4:10 p.m., Gregory DeFreitas
CRN 91985
If crack dealers make a lot of money, why do many of them live with their mothers? What is the economic rationale for helping strangers instead of looking out for only yourself? What is the "hidden economy" that creates most new jobs for New Yorkers? This 4-credit course is instructed in the spirit of the best-selling Freakonomics books. Students develop a short list of core economic concepts and present them in multiple real-world contexts. By the semester's end, students learn that economics is not limited to textbooks; rather, the material imprisoned between the covers jumps out almost everywhere.
Please note: This course satisfies a University graduation requirement in the Social Sciences category.

LEGAL EDUCATION ACCELERATED PROGRAM (LEAP)
Hofstra College of Liberal Arts and Sciences and Hofstra's Maurice A. Deane School of Law offer a selective, accelerated program in which students earn both the Bachelor of Arts and the Juris Doctor in six years (one year less than if each degree were pursued separately). LEAP students can choose from among a wide variety of liberal arts majors. For a full program description, please visit hofstra.edu/leap. LEAP students are strongly encouraged to register for one of the following first-year seminars:

23. PHI 14F, sec. 02: Law, Politics, and Society (HP), 4 s.h.
M/W/F, 9:50-11:05 a.m., Amy Baehr
CRN 93040
Every year, tens of thousands of young people enter law school and begin the study of legal rules. Most do so because they see the legal profession as a noble calling, and they enter it with a desire to promote justice. In their three years of full-time study of the law, however, these future lawyers spend little time thinking critically about legal rules and about the place of the lawyer in a just society. In this course we explore how our legal rules and constitutional norms have developed; how the American legal system interacts with the rest of our political institutions; how the American legal system reflects the cultural norms, class distinctions, and idiosyncrasies of our society; and how legal rules and the role of the lawyer relate to larger ideals of a just society.
Please note: This course satisfies a University graduation requirement in the Social Sciences category.

24. PSC 14F, sec. 01: Law, Politics, and Society (BH), 4 s.h.
T/TH, 9:50-11:50 a.m., James Sample
CRN TBD

LINGUISTICS

25. LING 14F, sec. 01: Language, Culture, and Discrimination (CC), 4 s.h.
W, 6-9 p.m., Benjamin Rifkin
CRN 95559
What distinguishes human language from communication systems among other animals? What do all languages have in common? How do babies develop language? How are language differences implicated in cultural conflict and discrimination? How do I speak differently to my roommate, to my mother, and to my professor? How is language used differently in different workplace contexts? How do people in America cross language and cultural barriers? How do we teach foreign languages to adults? In this course we address these and many other questions, taking linguistic facts as a point of departure and considering their implications. Through discussions and hands-on projects, students learn how to collect, analyze, and interpret language data and how to make informed decisions about language and education policies as voters and community members. This course includes 6 hours of service, outside of the class meeting time on Wednesday, providing ESL tutoring to immigrants or refugees in the Uniondale/Hempstead community.
Please note: This course satisfies a University graduation requirement in the Cross-Cultural category.  

MATHEMATICS

26. MATH 14F, sec. 01: The Mathematics of Elections (MA), 3 s.h.
T/TH, 2:20-3:45 p.m., Johanna Franklin
CRN 95313
How do we decide when a way to divide voters into congressional districts results in unfair representation (gerrymandering)? And, once we've established these districts, how do we decide which candidate wins? We'll spend the semester talking about different voting systems that are used to choose the winner of an election and ways to measure the fairness of redistricting methods.
Please note: This course satisfies a University graduation requirement in the Mathematics category.

MUSIC

27. MUS 14F, sec. 01: Thinking Musically: Experiencing and Expressing Through Sound (AA), 3 s.h.
M/W, 2:20-3:45 p.m., Cindy Bell and Nathalie Robinson
CRN 94268
Creating music allows us to express our innermost thoughts and feelings through the medium of sound. But how does one make music? What has inspired people through the ages to perform rhythms on drums, create symphonies, hum a tune, develop new instruments, or conduct an orchestra? This course explores music as a form of social and cultural expression as found in diverse musical traditions around the world. We develop our critical listening skills, learn to think broadly about what making music means, and why music is significant in human life. This course includes guest appearances by musical artists and field trips to performances in New York City.
Please note: This course satisfies a University graduation requirement in the Humanities category and is not intended for music majors.

PHILOSOPHY

28. PHI 14F, sec. 01: The Meaning of Life (HP), 5 s.h.
T/TH, 10:05 a.m.-noon, Mark McEvoy
CRN 93041
For us to have a chance of finding the meaning of life, human life must have meaning, or at least the lives of individual human beings must have meaning. But perhaps these claims aren't true, or don't even make sense. Further, if claims about life having meaning aren't true, or don't even make sense, would that horrify or at least disappoint you? If so, does that reaction itself show that life has some kind of meaning after all? We pursue these questions through class discussions and readings. This seminar includes one semester hour of LIBR 1: Introduction to Library and Information Technology. LIBR 1 is a distance learning course that introduces students to college-level research practices.
Please note: This course satisfies a University graduation requirement in the Social Sciences category; LIBR 1 satisfies part of the Liberal Arts requirement.

29. PHI 14F, sec. 03: Philosophy of Health and Wellness (HP), 3 s.h.
M/W, 2:55-4:20 p.m., Alina Feld
CRN 91980
It's challenging to become happy and healthy. For one thing, it can take a lot of work. But also, it's often hard to know what we should try to do. In fact, what it means to be healthy and what it means to be happy are not obvious. Do meanings vary from person to person, or are there some "right" definitions? Does our culture create meanings for them that not every culture shares? And why does research on health and happiness point us in so many different, sometimes opposite, directions? We discuss theories of what it means to be happy and healthy — classic and contemporary, philosophical and psychological — and learn how to assess current research on those topics with a sophisticated eye.
Please note: This course satisfies a University graduation requirement in the Social Sciences category.

PHYSICAL EDUCATION

30. PESP 32, sec. F98: T'ai Chi, 2 s.h.
M/W, 2:20-3:45 p.m., Craig Gee
CRN 91701
T'ai Chi Chuan (also referred to as Tai Chi, Tai Ji, or Taijiquan) is one of the oldest styles of Chinese martial arts, and is the most widely practiced style in the world today. The term "Tai Ji" refers to the ancient Chinese cosmological concept of the interplay between two opposite yet complementary forces (yin and yang). It is based on the principle of the soft overcoming the hard. Students begin with simple movements, and learn not only an ancient form of self-defense, but also how to calm the emotions and focus the mind. No background is presupposed.
Please note: This course is an elective. The semester hours count toward graduation, but the course does not satisfy a University graduation requirement.

31. PESP 47, sec. F99: Ballroom Dancing, 2 s.h.
T/TH, 12:45-1:45 p.m., Alexander Rothstein
CRN 92738
This course is designed to develop the student's ability to perform basic ballroom dance steps with an emphasis on proper ballroom dance technique, posture, dance frame, and communication through body movement (lead/follow). Students are introduced to ballroom dance concepts and skills while engaging the body in aerobic activity, and developing discipline and self-confidence. This class introduces students to basic dance steps within the three American dance categories: smooth, Latin, and rhythm. The curriculum includes the following American dance styles: waltz, fox-trot, tango, rumba, cha-cha, salsa/mambo, swing, and hustle. Additional concepts include timing, alignment, and dance position, and an introduction to styling.
Please note: This course is an elective. The semester hours count toward graduation, but the course does not satisfy a University graduation requirement.

POLITICAL SCIENCE

32. PSC 14F, sec. 02: Juvenile Justice in America (BH), 4 s.h.
T/TH, 12:10-2:05 p.m., Celeste Kaufman
CRN 93095
One of the greatest public policy challenges we face today is the increase in juvenile crime. Should we treat juvenile offenders as adults, or are they children who need guidance and rehabilitation? What age should we use as a barometer for when to treat juveniles as adults? What role do ethnicity and socioeconomic status play in juvenile delinquency? What can be done to reduce recidivism? Through the lenses of not only political science and law, but also sociology and philosophy, this course explores the historical antecedents of our present-day juvenile justice system, theories of juvenile delinquency, and philosophies for managing juvenile offenders. We compare and contrast the juvenile court system with the adult criminal courts as well as discuss landmark U.S. Supreme Court decisions on juvenile rights.
Please note: This course satisfies a University graduation requirement in the Social Sciences category.

PSYCHOLOGY

33. PSY 14F, sec. 01: CSI: Psychology (or, What Psychologists Could Teach Lawyers) (BH), 3 s.h.
M/W/F, 12:50-1:45 p.m., Robin Flaton
CRN 93066
In several recent high-profile cases, jury decisions have left people stunned and angry. What were those jurors thinking? How could a reasonable person have come to that decision? In this course we seek to make sense of these issues. Our focus is not on what jurors might be thinking, but on how jurors might be thinking — about the evidence they are presented, about the witnesses, the accused, the lawyers involved, and about each other. Can psychological research increase the likelihood of a "just" outcome in the courtroom? To answer this question, we examine several areas, including the validity of eyewitness identifications; the effect of institutional racism within the criminal justice system; the efficacy of psychological jury selection; and some cognitive and social dynamics of juror deliberation.
Please note: This course satisfies a University graduation requirement in the Social Sciences category.

34. PSY 14F, sec. 02: Psychology Through Film and Literature (BH), 3 s.h.
M/W, 2:55-4:20 p.m., Lola Nouryan
CRN 91720
This course provides a basic understanding of psychological disorder through film and literature. By studying the work of selected writers, directors and filmmakers, we investigate the basis of "abnormal" behavior. Our goal is to understand mental illness and its treatment. To that end, we examine the ways in which writers and filmmakers portray character, communication, and perceptual experience.
Please note: This course satisfies a University graduation requirement in the Social Sciences category.

SOCIOLOGY

35. SOC 14F, sec. 01: Power, Protest, and Your Future in America's Democracy (BH), 4 s.h.
T/TH, 11:10 a.m.-1:05 p.m., Cynthia Bogard
CRN 94409
What makes a democracy a democracy, and does America's system of government still fit that definition? How does our political system support our democracy and civil institutions, and what happens when it doesn't? How can we change our democracy, and when would we need to? What is the purpose of protest in America, and what determines whether it is effective? To explore these questions, we'll learn about the basic structures of American society and investigate how power works. We'll read and react to the news of the day and the words of leaders, protesters, and average citizens. We'll talk together about what holds the country together and what can drive it apart. We'll explore the rhetoric America has created about itself – a "democratic" rhetoric particular to our society's needs and its sense of itself. We'll even explore the consequences of not having the civil society upon which our democracy is built. And we'll examine how protests abroad fit into a larger discussion of democracy.
Please note: This course satisfies a University graduation requirement in the Social Sciences category.

WRITING STUDIES AND RHETORIC

36. RHET 14F, sec. 01: Political Communication in the 2018 Midterm Elections (CP), 4 s.h.
M/W, 12:50-2:45 p.m., Philip Dalton
CRN 95560
This fall we will be immersed in a hotly contested midterm election cycle during which the House of Representatives, the U.S. Senate, and President Trump's agenda may all hang in the balance. Will Democrats offer a clearer contrast to Republicans? Will Republicans moderate their message? Will Independents and Democratic Socialists factor into messaging strategy? Will new forms of media continue to disrupt conventional communication practices? The objectives of the course are to understand the strategy, effects, and ethics of messaging, various media, and complex audiences during an election. Students will be introduced to explanations of how and why political candidates craft their messages and how audiences receive and interpret these messages. We will explore political communication from the standpoints of theory, media effects, rhetoric, history, and contemporary practice.
Please note. This course satisfies a University graduation requirement in the Humanities category.


For more information, please contact:
Center for University Advising
101 Memorial Hall, South Campus
Phone: 516-463-6770 or 516-463-7222
Email: Advising[at]hofstra.edu