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Cultural Center

Cultural Center Event Videos

We are continuously expanding the video collection recorded during select Hofstra Cultural Center events.
Please scroll through the list to see the full listing of event recordings.

For more live and recorded Hofstra events:

Locking Up Our Own: Crime and Punishment In Black America thumbnail
  • 7-NOV-17 - Based on James Forman Jr.'s critically acclaimed book by the same name, this talk builds on Forman’s work as a public defender, a founder of a charter school for incarcerated teens, and a law professor to outline the criminal justice crisis with both data and human stories. He leaves the audience with hope for what can be done to make a difference, and how they themselves can contribute to change.
Peter Chadwick: Brutal Library thumbnail
  • 1-NOV-17 - Peter Chadwick delivered the keynote lecture and serve as scholar-in-residence for the Brutal Library symposium. He is a London-based art director and graphic designer.
Engineering Baseball: STEM, Management, and the National Pastime - Science Night Live thumbnail
  • 1-NOV-17 - Science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) and management have been used in professional baseball from the time of “scientific baseball” in the early 1900’s to the application of Moneyball, big data analysis, and advanced analytics today. Professional baseball has long been linked to applications in STEM and such diverse fields as statistical analysis and optimization, ergonomics, material science, as well as organizational behavior and management theory. This discussion may change how you watch and think about baseball.
Engineering Baseball: STEM, Management, and the National Pastime - Science Night Live thumbnail
  • 1-NOV-17 - Science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) and management have been used in professional baseball from the time of “scientific baseball” in the early 1900’s to the application of Moneyball, big data analysis, and advanced analytics today. Professional baseball has long been linked to applications in STEM and such diverse fields as statistical analysis and optimization, ergonomics, material science, as well as organizational behavior and management theory. This discussion may change how you watch and think about baseball.
Breaking News or Making News? Evaluating Media Coverage of the White House thumbnail
  • 19-OCT-17 - Peter S. Kalkow Center for the Study of the American Presidency presents Breaking News or Making News? Evaluating Media Coverage of the White House. The panel featured Tom DeFrank, Contributing Editor, National Journal.
Feminizing Farming: World War I and Female Agricultural Resilience in France thumbnail
  • 18-OCT-17 - Dr. Nicole Dombrowski-Risser, Professor of History at Towson University discusses Feminizing Farming: World War I and Female Agricultural Resilience in France.
What Mathematics Can Tell Us About Cancer thumbnail
  • 11-OCT-17 - J.B. Nation, a leading specialist in universal algebra, has been involved over the last 10 years in interdisciplinary study of genetic data on cancer patients, with the bio-informatics group at the University of Hawaii Cancer Center and The Queen's Medical Center in Honolulu.
Thinking Like an Attacker: An Introduction to Red Team Security thumbnail
  • 11-OCT-17 - Ada Lovelace Day, named for the 19th-century mathematician who pioneered computational programming, is a worldwide event highlighting the achievements of women in science. This year, Hofstra commemorated the day with a presentation by Cassia Martin, Senior Security Engineer at Amazon.
Sinkholes of Doom - Science Night Live thumbnail
  • 4-OCT-17 - Sinkholes form all over the world, but there are some places where they form more than others. Why is there such a variation in sinkhole formation over time and space? Why do places like Brooklyn and Florida seem to get more sinkholes than other places? This lecture will review the formation of some of the most dramatic sinkholes on the planet—including some in our own backyard.
Is There a Human GPS System? - Science Night Live thumbnail
  • 13-APR-17 - How is it that some people always know how to get from one place to another, and others always get lost? What do we know about how humans navigate, and can we predict their actions before they even start? This talk explores navigation research using everything from video games to real-world forests – and confirms the belief that there are good navigators and people who are perpetually lost. Speaker: Elisabeth J. Ploran, Assistant Professor of Psychology, Hofstra University
Silvia Federici - On the 150th Anniversary of the Publication of Capital thumbnail
  • 6-APR-17 - From the conference Marx's Critique of Political Economy and the Global Crisis Today

    Karl Marx was simultaneously one of the founders and one of the most important critics of the modern social sciences. All of the social sciences and humanities today draw widely from his work. At the core of Marx’s published work is his analysis of capitalism: Volume One of Capital, published in 1867. Capital defined his labor theory of value, which Marx drew from Adam Smith, David Ricardo, and the whole of classical political economy. This symposium draws together leading scholars from all over the world who have been applying the Marxian analytical apparatus — including his labor theory of value — to decipher and understand the current global economic and political crisis.
A Van Jordan - Great Writers, Great Readings thumbnail
  • 16-MAR-17 - A. Van Jordan has published four books of poetry: The Cineaste: Poems, Quantum Lyrics, M-A-C-N-O-L-I-A, and Rise. His poetry is influenced by music, film, race, history, and pop culture. His most recent book, The Cineaste, marries his love of film with poetry in pieces that re-examine a wide range of seminal films such as Nosferatu (1922), The Homesteader (1919), Run Lola Run (1998), and Oldboy (2003) through the perspectives of both the voyeur and the character onscreen. Jordan has been awarded the Anisfield-Wolf Book Award, the Lannan Literary Award, and the Whiting Writers' Award, as well as fellowships from the John Simon Guggenheim Foundation and United States Artists, among others. He currently teaches in Warren Wilson College's MFA Program for Writers and serves as the Henry Rutgers Presidential Professor at Rutgers University-Newark.
Science Night Live: Tales of Designer Drugs thumbnail
  • 9-MAR-17 - Designer drugs such as “Spice,” “Bath Salts” and “Molly” have spread rapidly around the world in the past decade, fueled by cheap and inventive chemistry and the rapid distribution through Web 2.0. Hospitals, law enforcement and legislators are struggling to keep up with increasing cases associated with these dangerous products. What are our solutions? Speaker: Ling Huang, Associate Professor of Chemistry, Hofstra University
Social Media Use in the 2016 Presidential Election's Influence thumbnail
  • 16-FEB-17 - The Peter S. Kalikow School of Government, Public Policy and International Affairs presents How Has Social Media Influenced the 2016 Race for the White House and Policy Deliberations in 2017? This is a two-panel event. The second panel is How Will the Use of Social Media in the 2016 Presidential Election Influence Political Deliberation and Policymaking? While social media is popularly credited with facilitating greater public participation and political agency, the research is not entirely clear. This panel considers how social media shapes public deliberation by looking at social media research from the 2016 presidential election and the Black Lives Matter movement.
How Did Social Media Change the 2016 Presidential Race? thumbnail
  • 16-FEB-17 - The Peter S. Kalikow School of Government, Public Policy and International Affairs presents How Has Social Media Influenced the 2016 Race for the White House and Policy Deliberations in 2017? This two panel event will start with How Did Social Media Change the 2016 Presidential Race? According to The Washington Post, “2016 may yet be the first ‘Instagram election.’” This panel explores how the 2016 presidential candidates utilized social media; the implications of the ability of candidates to bypass the traditional press to communicate with voters directly via social media; how the candidates debated and responded to one another on social media platforms; and the role that social media played in determining the outcome of the election.
Science Night Live: Darwin and Hume's Excellent Intelligent Design Adventure thumbnail
  • 16-FEB-17 - Does the universe show evidence of having been designed by an intelligent agent? See Charles Darwin and the philosopher David Hume tackle this question live on stage!
Phi Beta Kappa Visiting Scholar - Philip Kitcher: Six Problems of Climate Change thumbnail
  • 2-DEC-16 - Debates concerning what to do about climate change -- and whether to do anything at all -- turn on six major questions: (1) Is it real? (2) Does it matter? (3) How much should we care about the future? (4) What can be done? (5) Who will pay? (6) Do we need new politics? Philip Kitcher, John Dewey Professor of Philosophy at Columbia University, explains these questions, and suggests answers to them. The lecture is drawn from a forthcoming book, co-authored with Evelyn Fox Keller, The Seasons Alter: How to Save Our Planet in Six Acts (W.W. Norton, 2017).
What Was the President-elect's Road to Victory in 2016? thumbnail
  • 18-NOV-16 - Meena Bose, Executive Dean for Public Policy and Public Service Programs moderates a panel with participants: Howard B. Dean III, Senior Presidential Fellow, Peter S. Kalikow Center for the Study of the American Presidency Hofstra University and Chairman, Democratic National Committee, 2005-2009; Edward J. Rollins, Senior Presidential Fellow, Peter S. Kalikow Center for the Study of the American Presidency Hofstra University, Political Strategist; and Reid J. Epstein, National Political Reporter The Wall Street Journal.
Extending the Human Lifespan: Implications of an Aging Population - Science Night Live thumbnail
  • 16-NOV-16 - Public health efforts and improvements in medicine have led to record increases in life expectancy globally. The growth of the older adult population and the declining fertility rate will have significant consequences and require new thinking on the structure of health care systems, housing, workforce, and social services.
What Was the President-elect's Road to Victory in 2016? thumbnail
  • 15-NOV-16 - Meena Bose, Executive Dean for Public Policy and Public Service Programs moderates a panel with participants: Howard B. Dean III, Senior Presidential Fellow, Peter S. Kalikow Center for the Study of the American Presidency Hofstra University and Chairman, Democratic National Committee, 2005-2009; Edward J. Rollins, Senior Presidential Fellow, Peter S. Kalikow Center for the Study of the American Presidency Hofstra University, Political Strategist; and Reid J. Epstein, National Political Reporter The Wall Street Journal.
Still the Superpower? How Will the United States Lead in the World in 2017? thumbnail
  • 28-OCT-16 - Meena Bose, Executive Dean for Public Policy and Public Service Programs moderates a panel with participants: Howard B. Dean III, Senior Presidential Fellow, Peter S. Kalikow Center for the Study of the American Presidency Hofstra University and Chairman, Democratic National Committee, 2005-2009; Edward J. Rollins, Senior Presidential Fellow, Peter S. Kalikow Center for the Study of the American Presidency Hofstra University, Political Strategist, and Michael A. Cohen, Author, Columnist and Regular Commentator, Boston Globe and World Politics Review, U.S Political Correspondent, London Observer.
Dr. Jessica Santangelo - Science Night Live thumbnail
  • 27-OCT-16 - Caught Between a Rock and a Hot Place: Coral Reefs and Climate Change

    Dr. Jessica Santangelo shares her research adventures in the Florida Keys, Mexico, Hawaii and Palau. She discusses the impacts of the recent El Niño and ocean acidification on corals (and other marine ecosystems) around the world.
Phillip Lopate - Great Writers, Great Readings thumbnail
  • 28-SEP-16 - Phillip Lopate has written four personal essay collections—Bachelorhood (Little, Brown, 1981), Against Joie de Vivre (Poseidon-Simon & Schuster, 1989), Portrait of My Body (Doubleday-Anchor, 1996) and Portrait Inside My Head (Free Press/Simon & Schuster, 2013); two novels, Confessions of Summer (Doubleday, 1979) and The Rug Merchant (Viking, 1987); two poetry collections, The Eyes Don't Always Want to Stay Open (Sun Press, 1972) and The Daily Round (Sun Press, 1976); a memoir of his teaching experiences, Being With Children (Doubleday, 1975); a collection of his movie criticism, Totally Tenderly Tragically (Doubleday-Anchor); an urbanist meditation, Waterfront: A Journey Around Manhattan (Crown, 2004); and a biographical monograph, Rudy Burckhardt: Photographer and Filmmaker (Harry N. Abrams, 2004.)
Creative Thinking: A 21st Century Success Skill thumbnail
  • 25-APR-16 - Gerard Puccio, Department Chair and Professor at the International Center for Studies in Creativity, Buffalo State, the State University of New York
What is Creativity? Cross-Cultural and Cross-Disciplinary Perspectives thumbnail
  • 25-APR-16 - This presentation will describe diverse paradigms of creativity across time and culture and not be restricted to definitions proffered by traditional researchers on creativity.
An Inventor's Vision of the Future: Innovation and Creativity thumbnail
  • 19-APR-16 - ALisa Seacat DeLuca, a technology strategist for IBM Commerce, was named one of MIT’s 2015 “35 Innovators Under 35” and one of Fast Company’s “100 Most Creative People in Business.” Ms. DeLuca was also named a 2015 “Working Mother of the Year” and in 2014, was named one of Network World’s “50 Most Fascinating People in the World of Technology.” A TED speaker, she is the most prolific female inventor in IBM history and, at only 32 years old, is one of the youngest inventors at IBM to ever reach the 100th Invention Plateau Award. Her innovation portfolio includes over 380 patent applications filed within the United States and abroad, of which over 180 have been granted, to date. The subjects of her patent ideas include areas such as cloud, mobile, IoT, social, security, and everything in between.
Hunting for Beneficial Microbes on Long Island - Science Night Live thumbnail
  • 14-APR-16 - An introduction to the microbes being studied in the lab of Javier Izquierdo, Hofstra assistant professor of biology – including their uses in biofuel production and agriculture. The focus of the lab is on “locally grown” microbes that have been collected from various sources, from vineyard soils on the North Fork to sand dunes on the South Shore to zoo animals.

    Speaker: Dr. Javier Izquierdo, Department of Biology, Hofstra University
Unconventional Wisdom? Presidential Politics in 2016 thumbnail
  • 10-MAR-16 - Hofstra Senior Presidential Fellows Howard B. Dean III and Edward J. Rollins, along with Glenn Thrush, Chief Political Correspondent, Politico and Lawrence Levy, Executive Dean, National Center for Suburban Studies at Hofstra University, led a panel discussion on Unconventional Wisdom? Presidential Politics in 2016 on Thursday, March 10, sponsored by the Peter S. Kalikow Center for the Study of the American Presidency.
Remember the Triangle Fire thumbnail
  • 8-MAR-16 - On March 25, 1911, a fire broke out at the Triangle Shirtwaist Company factory located one block east of Washington Square Park. Beginning on the eighth floor, the fire burned through three floors of the Asch Building, now NYU’s Brown Building. There were over 500 employees -- mostly young women and recent immigrants. Because the owners had locked the doors to the stairwells and exits -- a then-common practice to prevent workers from taking unauthorized breaks -- many of the workers could not escape and jumped from the high windows. Fire trucks arrived, but their ladders reached only the sixth floor. The elevators ran as long as they could as workers pressed into the cars; some tumbled down the elevator shaft. In the end, 146 people died. There was a trial, but the owners -- long known for their anti-union activities -- were acquitted. The fire became a rallying cry for the international labor movement. Many of our fire safety laws were created in response to this tragic event and improved safety standards.
Superbugs and Superdrugs: The Future of Antibiotics - Science Night Live thumbnail
  • 2-MAR-16 - Dr. Scott Lefurgy traces the problem of antibiotic-resistant bacteria from the early victories of penicillin to the current struggles against MRSA and the threat of CRE. His research focuses on understanding the structure of bacterial enzymes that cause resistance to antibiotics, so that drug designers can address this ever-changing threat.
Great Writers, Great Readings: Laurie Sheck thumbnail
  • 22-FEB-16 - Laurie Sheck is the author of several collections of poetry, including Captivity, Black Series; The Willow Grove, which was a finalist for the Pulitzer Prize; Io at Night; and Amaranth. She is also the editor of the anthology Poem a Day, Volume 2 and the author of the hybrid work A Monster’s Notes , which re-examines the un-named monster in Mary Shelley’s Frankenstein. Her poems have been included in two volumes of Best American Poetry and three volumes of The Pushcart Prize: Best of the Small Presses. Her honors include fellowships from the Guggenheim Foundation, the Ingram Merrill Foundation, the National Endowment for the Arts, and the New Jersey State Council for the Arts. She teaches in the MFA program at the New School.
Science Night Live: When Dinosaurs Ruled New York thumbnail
  • 3-FEB-16 - Dr. J Bret Bennington, Department of Geology, Environment and Sustainability, Hofstra University, takes a look at Mesozoic fossils and the important history of dinosaur studies in New York and the Northeast.
Understanding Personality, Leadership and Policy Making in the Lyndon Baines Johnson Presidency thumbnail
  • 4-DEC-15 - Peter S. Kalikow Center for the Study of the American Presidency and the Hofstra Cultural Center presents A Commemoration of the 50th Anniversary of the Voting Rights Act of 1965: The Promise and the Challenge. A panel discussion will address Understanding Personality, Leadership and Policy Making in the Lyndon Baines Johnson Presidency.
The 2016 Elections and American Foreign Policy: Constraints, Challenges, Opportunities? thumbnail
  • 5-NOV-15 - Hofstra Senior Presidential Fellows Howard B. Dean III and Edward J. Rollins, along with author and journalist James Mann, leads a panel discussion on The 2016 Elections and American Foreign Policy: Constraints, Challenges, Opportunities?
A Conversation with Dr. Bernice A. King thumbnail
  • 23-OCT-15 - Dr. Bernice A. King (Be A King), the chief executive officer of The King Center and youngest daughter of the late Coretta Scott King and Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr., is nationally and internationally known as one of the most powerful, motivating and life-changing orators and speakers on the circuit today.
Great Writers, Great Readings: Karen Russell thumbnail
  • 20-OCT-15 - Karen Russell’s debut novel, Swamplandia!, was chosen by The New York Times as one of the Ten Best Books of 2011 and was a finalist for the 2012 Pulitzer Prize. Russell has been featured in The New Yorker’s 20 Under 40 list, and was chosen as one of Granta’s Best Young American Novelists. In 2009, she received the 5 Under 35 award from the National Book Foundation. In 2013 she was named a recipient of a MacArthur Fellowship -- the youngest of the year’s 24 winners.
How Do Millennials Engage in Public Policy and Public Service? thumbnail
  • 15-OCT-15 - Hofstra Senior Presidential Fellows Howard B. Dean III and Edward J. Rollins, along with Scott Rechler, Chairman and CEO of RXR Realty and Christopher K. Norton, Vice Chairman, Board of Directors of The Washington Center, led a panel discussion on How Do Millennials Engage in Public Policy and Public Service? on Thursday, October 15, sponsored by the Peter S. Kalikow Center for the Study of the American Presidency.
Hofstra, Cambridge Union Debate Police-Race Relations thumbnail
  • 1-APR-15 - Hofstra University partnered with the Cambridge Union Society, the world’s oldest continually operating debate society, to host the second annual Cambridge – Hofstra Debate series, with two public debates. The debate featured teams of students from Cambridge Union Society and the Hofstra’s Debate Team.
Should Nuclear Energy Be Expanded to Help Create a More Sustainable Future? thumbnail
  • 21-NOV-14 - In recent years, many concerned with global warming have advocated that we quickly increase the amount of nuclear energy produced around the world in order to replace carbon-based energy to significantly reduce greenhouse gas emissions. However, many others have raised concerns about nuclear waste and safety and disagree with this approach. Panelists will debate whether nuclear energy has a place in our efforts to create a more sustainable future.
Understanding the 2014 Midterm Elections and Consequences for 2016 thumbnail
  • 11-NOV-14
Pelé Honorary Degree thumbnail
  • 12-APR-14
Foucault Conference thumbnail
  • 28-MAR-14
The Edge of Therapy: Student Yoga and Mindful Practice thumbnail
  • 3-MAR-14
Cornel West thumbnail
  • 3-OCT-12