Student Retention Rates

Entering Class First Year
Fall 2009
82.5%
Fall 2010
78.3%
Fall 2011
88.5%
Fall 2012
80.2%
Fall 2013
88.3%
Fall 2014
89.0%
Fall 2015
83.7%
Fall 2016
90.8%
Fall 2017
84.4%
Fall 2018
84.5%
Fall 2019 89.2%
  • Retention rates show the percentage of students who remain at an institution or in a major after they begin coursework. They are based on incoming freshman cohorts each fall.
  • Percentages include all students majoring in Journalism, Media Studies, and Public Relations.

Student Graduation Rates

Entering Class Fourth Year Fifth Year
Fall 2006
53.4%
60.2%
Fall 2007
65.6%
70.3%
Fall 2008
58.2%
61.2%
Fall 2009
63.1%
68.9%
Fall 2010
65.2%
68.5%
Fall 2011
70.8%
79.2%
Fall 2012
65.6%
68.8%
Fall 2013
70.9%
74.8%
Fall 2014
75.0%
78%
Fall 2015
68.6%
75.6%
  • Although, many students graduate in four years, some take five years or more.
  • Graduation rates are calculated by dividing the number of graduating students by the number of students in a cohort. They are based on incoming freshman cohorts each fall.

Internship Locations by Academic Year:

When Hiring, What do Employers Look For?

From January 9 to 13, 2013, Hart Research Associates conducted an online survey among 318 employers whose organizations have at least 25 employees and report that 25% or more of their new hires hold either an associate degree from a two-year college or a bachelor's degree from a four-year college. Respondents are executives at private sector and nonprofit organizations, including owners, CEOs, presidents, C-suite level executives, and vice presidents.

  • Nearly all employers surveyed (95%) say they give hiring preference to college graduates with skills that will enable them to contribute to innovation in the workplace.
  • Nearly all those surveyed (93%) say that "a demonstrated capacity to think critically, communicate clearly, and solve complex problems is more important than [a candidate's] undergraduate major."
  • More than 9 in 10 of those surveyed say it is important that those they hire demonstrate ethical judgment and integrity; intercultural skills; and the capacity for continued new learning.
  • More than 75% of employers say they want more emphasis on 5 key areas including:
    • critical thinking,
    • complex problem-solving,
    • written communication,
    • oral communication, and
    • applied knowledge in real-world settings.
  • Employers endorse several educational practices as potentially helpful in preparing college students for workplace success. These include practices that require students to
  • conduct research and use evidence-based analysis;
  • gain in-depth knowledge in the major and analytic, problem solving and communication skills; and
  • apply their learning in real-world settings.

It Takes More than a Major: Employer Priorities for College Learning and Student Success. 2013. Washington, DC: Association of American Colleges and Universities and Hart Research Associates.

http://www.aacu.org/leap/presidentstrust/compact/2013SurveySummary.cfm