If you are having any difficulty using this website, please contact the Help Desk at Help@nullHofstra.edu or 516-463-7777 or Student Access Services at SAS@nullhofstra.edu or 516-463-7075. Please identify the webpage address or URL and the specific problems you have encountered and we will address the issue.

Skip to Main Content
IT Security at Hofstra University

Do you have a suspicious-looking email?

Don’t click!

Forward to phishing@hofstra.edu!

We will safely examine the email to see if it is legitimate and report illegitimate emails. We will let you know what we find.

Real-Life Stories

Nothing hits home more effectively than real stories from real people. Online security threats are not only statistics -- people just like those in the Hofstra community suffer the consequences of digital crimes everyday. Others have near-misses that can also be very instructive.

Let us know your story! Email us (we'll keep it anonymous).

 

  • Forbes Magazine contributor John Wasik details how his stolen Social Security number (the result of charity work, no less) resulted in a tax-filing mess: http://www.forbes.com/sites/johnwasik/2014/06/05/how-i-was-hacked-by-a-tax-scam-safeguards-you-can-employ-now/
  • Developer Naoki Hiroshima was one of the first to secure a Twitter username back when the micro-blogging service went live. Read how a hacker used bits of Hiroshima's personal information to hijack his other accounts and coerce him into forefeiting his very valuable handle: https://medium.com/@N/how-i-lost-my-50-000-twitter-username-24eb09e026dd.
  • Gary Warner, a security expert who blogs about cyber crime, recently discussed his unsatisfactory experiences with the criminal justice systemafter becoming the victim of credit card fraud. See the TEDx video here: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=MPMr5jPwA7I
  • An administrator at Hofstra relays this story:
    Since my son would be in South Korea for 3 months, I recently applied for a credit card that would have no service fee attached when used overseas. I received two cards (one in my name & one in my son's name) after my son had already left. I sent him a care package with books & candy and included his card in the box. He received the box intact with no evidence it had been tampered with. A week later I looked at my account online and saw the one and only charge on that account was for $950 to State Farm Insurance. Luckily neither of us had ever used the card so this charge very easily caught me attention. I called the bank and informed them I had no accounts with State Farm and had not made the transaction. Later I received a letter from the bank saying the temporary credit they issued to me was now permanent and I was not responsible for the $950. If this had happened on a card I use more frequently I wonder if I would have caught it in a timely manner. I'd like to know whose name was on the policy purchased from State Farm with my credit card.
  • A Computer Center staff member at Hofstra remembers this incident:
    I was at Disney World during Thanksgiving when I tried to use my card and it was declined. I knew that something was wrong so I called up customer service. They told me that since I used it at a small gas station in Georgia they froze my account. The representative on the phone said that during Thanksgiving,  I had never used my credit card off of Long Island, and that it seemed suspicious that I was in Georgia. They froze the account immediately in case my identity did get stolen.

Do you have a suspicious-looking email?

Don’t click!

Forward to phishing@hofstra.edu!

We will safely examine the email to see if it is legitimate and report illegitimate emails. We will let you know what we find.